Collegiate Baseball Newspaper http://baseballnews.com Tue, 19 Feb 2019 15:12:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 Here’s How To Balance Baseball And Academics http://baseballnews.com/heres-how-to-balance-baseball-and-academics/ http://baseballnews.com/heres-how-to-balance-baseball-and-academics/#respond Thu, 14 Feb 2019 23:11:48 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12979 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball WACO, Tex. — One of the amazing coaches in college baseball is Mitch Thompson of McLennan Community College. His coaching career spans three decades and includes 23 years at the NCAA Division I level, including 22 years in the Big 12 and Southeastern Conferences with stops at Baylor, Auburn […]

The post Here’s How To Balance Baseball And Academics appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

WACO, Tex. — One of the amazing coaches in college baseball is Mitch Thompson of McLennan Community College.

His coaching career spans three decades and includes 23 years at the NCAA Division I level, including 22 years in the Big 12 and Southeastern Conferences with stops at Baylor, Auburn and Mississippi St.

In five seasons under Thompson’s leadership, McLennan has amassed a 214-88 record and have made five consecutive post-season appearance for the first time since the 1990s.

No other junior college in the country is accomplishing the combination of winning games, developing players and excelling in the classroom better than his program.

Here is a rundown on the special achievements his program has had over the last few years:

  • Most drafted catchers of any college in the USA the last three years (4).
  • Highest drafted junior college player in the nation last year in Josh Breaux who was a second round pick by the Yankees.
  • Since 2014, nearly 15 players a year have signed with 4-year colleges.
  • Over the last five years, 13 players have been chosen in the MLB Draft.
  • Over the 2017-2018 academic year, McLennan had the third highest grade point average of any NJCAA school at 3.51.
  • Over the 2016-2017 academic year, McLennan again had the third highest GPA of any NJCAA school at 3.42.

The numbers above all others that jump out are the team academic figures.

Many junior college baseball teams are filled with athletes who were average to poor students in high school. That is why junior college baseball is the land of second chances for many baseball players. Players with poor academic skills routinely transfer out of 4-year colleges and into junior colleges.

“Having baseball players at the junior college level who are poor academically may be true at many places,” said Thompson.

“What we have done is stress in the recruiting process that I am looking for three things.

“First, I want a kid who wants to be a champion on the baseball field — a guy who really wants to develop. I want a guy who thinks he can play in the Big Leagues.

“Second, I want kids who understand the value of an education. He realizes that playing in the Big Leagues will be a difficult task. So he prepares for life.

“Third, I want a good kid from a good family. He must understand the importance of hard work.

“Not everybody is a good fit for us. We are honest about all three areas with potential players. We will tell a recruit that if he doesn’t have these the qualities, and this is not who you truly are, then this is probably not the place for you.”

To read more of this article which explains the system in place that McLennan players have thrived in, purchase the Feb. 8, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post Here’s How To Balance Baseball And Academics appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/heres-how-to-balance-baseball-and-academics/feed/ 0
David Esquer Has Faced Big Hurdles In Career http://baseballnews.com/david-esquer-has-faced-big-hurdles-in-career/ http://baseballnews.com/david-esquer-has-faced-big-hurdles-in-career/#respond Thu, 14 Feb 2019 21:04:32 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12974 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball STANFORD, Calif. — Stanford Head Baseball Coach David Esquer is living proof that hard work can overcome almost any disaster. Esquer succeeded Mark Marquess on June 16, 2017 when the Hall of Fame coach retired after 41 years at the helm of the Cardinal. Esquer played under Marques on […]

The post David Esquer Has Faced Big Hurdles In Career appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

STANFORD, Calif. — Stanford Head Baseball Coach David Esquer is living proof that hard work can overcome almost any disaster.

Esquer succeeded Mark Marquess on June 16, 2017 when the Hall of Fame coach retired after 41 years at the helm of the Cardinal.

Esquer played under Marques on Stanford’s 1987 national championship team and was an assistant under Marquess from 1991-96.

Last season was Esquer’s first as head coach of Stanford as he led the Cardinal to a 46-12 record.

What is unique about this terrific coach is that he coached at arch-rival California for 18 years prior to being chosen as the skipper at Stanford and led Cal to five NCAA Regionals and the 2011 College World Series.

In September of 2010, administrators at the University of California announced their intention to eliminate baseball along with three other sports.

It was a shocking announcement since the baseball program was the oldest athletics program at California with a proud 119-year history.

The baseball program had won two national titles, including the first College World Series in 1947 and another in 1957 and had appeared in the CWS five times heading into the 2011 season.

A big factor in the decision to do away with Cal baseball was Title IX.

Several months after the announcement, administrators backtracked in mid-February of 2011 as they announced that men’s rugby, women’s lacrosse and women’s gymnastics would be allowed to continue, but baseball and men’s gymnastics would still be eliminated at the end of the 2010-11 academic year.

It was another body blow to the baseball program.

Just prior to the announcement by Cal administrators, a report in the New York Times said that if they went through with their original plan to cut four sports and demote rugby to varsity club status, it would cause a compliance issue with the federal gender equity law and force further cuts to men’s roster spots.

The article said that administrators would be forced to cut 80 men from remaining teams and add 50 women to come into line with Title IX.

The baseball program seemed to be on death row.

What happened next was historic in the annuals of college sports. California baseball boosters came to the rescue of the baseball program, raising $10 million in two months which allowed the program to be rescued from the chopping block.

This money is being utilized to finance the baseball program at California as a fully funded NCAA Division I varsity sport.

The Cal Baseball Foundation was established to make this happen. This remarkable group of people headed by Stu Gordon (pitcher on the Cal. 1960-61 teams) and Dan McInerny (member of the Cal 1980 CWS team) worked on raising $25 million for a permanent baseball program endowment so it can operate off the interest forever.

This bold plan has never been done in college athletics’ history for a varsity sport on the NCAA Division I level, according to several long time administrators Collegiate Baseball contacted.

To read more of this article, purchase the Feb. 8, 2019 edition or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post David Esquer Has Faced Big Hurdles In Career appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/david-esquer-has-faced-big-hurdles-in-career/feed/ 0
Resurrecting Program From The Scrap Heap http://baseballnews.com/resurrecting-program-from-the-scrap-heap/ http://baseballnews.com/resurrecting-program-from-the-scrap-heap/#comments Mon, 11 Feb 2019 22:54:17 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12968 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball ST. LOUIS, Mo. — A remarkable story is unfolding at Harris-Stowe State University. Founded in 1887, this NAIA institution has an undergraduate enrollment of about 1,400 located in St. Louis and has a baseball program that is unique. Head Coach CJ Bilbrey only has 2.5 scholarships to work with […]

The post Resurrecting Program From The Scrap Heap appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

ST. LOUIS, Mo. — A remarkable story is unfolding at Harris-Stowe State University.

Founded in 1887, this NAIA institution has an undergraduate enrollment of about 1,400 located in St. Louis and has a baseball program that is unique.

Head Coach CJ Bilbrey only has 2.5 scholarships to work with and a total budget of $20,000.

  • His yearly salary as the skipper is $4,000 while his lead assistant earns $4,000 and a third coach $1,000. He also has several volunteer coaches. The rest of the money goes toward running the program.
  • Every year, his players bring in an extra $50,000 through fundraising efforts by working St. Louis Cardinals’ games, a PGA tournament, Six Flags and other events with the money being used for travel, food and other necessary areas within the program.
  • To save money, many meals on road trips are peanut butter and jelly sandwiches which are affectionately called “Stowe Steaks” by members of the team.
  • On all but one road trip, coaches drive two vans to away games which also saves money to destinations as far away as six hours. The one bus trip with a hired driver typically includes all of the team as a thank you for fundraising efforts.
  • Because of money constraints, each player is required to purchase three jerseys — home pinstripe white, away brown plus a special jersey designed every year by the seniors in addition to practice gear. The entire cost is about $300.

Bilbrey and his wife Crystal own a shirt company and make all of the players’ practice apparel in their kitchen to reduce the total cost for players.

The cost of jerseys and practice gear is typically picked up by different family members as a Christmas gift to players. Once a player graduates or leaves the program, he takes his jerseys and practice apparel with him as a special memento.

Hats, belts, socks and pants are all supplied by Harris-Stowe.

The payoff for all of this sacrifice by players is being able to practice six days a week when cold weather hits at the All-Star Performance facility in St. Louis six days a week. It is 50,000 square feet, including 12 batting cages, eight bullpen mounds and indoor infield with three practice turf areas.

In 2013, Harris-Stowe suffered through the torture of 5-38 season.

After the last game, it was discovered that one of the players had dropped out of school before the season ended and never told any of the coaches.

So all five of those wins were vacated as the season record nosedived to 0-43.

“I arrived at Harris-Stowe in the fall of 2013, and it was rough,” said Bilbrey.

“My buddy David Estes was the head coach at the time, and he worked tirelessly.

“It just got to be too much. He got out of coaching and is selling insurance now and doing well for himself.

“I left Southern Illinois-Edwardsville, an NCAA Division I program, to be a part of an 0-43 NAIA program as a volunteer. The reason I was interested in this position was because I played for Harris-Stowe four years (2004-07) before starting my coaching career.

“I immediately jumped into recruiting when I got there. When I called up kids to recruit them, many weren’t that good. But we needed eligible bodies at that point to field a team. I was going after pitchers who threw 81-82 mph. They would routinely tell me that they would rather retire than go to Harris-Stowe.

“I told them good luck. We are going to continue working hard and will be much better in the coming years.

“In that first recruiting class I helped with, only one guy ultimately was with us for four years. In his last two years, he helped the team win 60 games over the 2017 and 2018 seasons.”

In 2014, the Eagles won 11 games which was followed by 14 in 2015.

Bilbrey was named head coach, and Harris-Stowe won 18 games in his first season as skipper in 2016.

Then the team broke through with 30 wins in both 2017 and 2018 — only the third and four time a baseball team at Harris-Stowe has won 30 or more games in the 75-year-history of the program.

To read more of this article, purchase the Feb. 8, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post Resurrecting Program From The Scrap Heap appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/resurrecting-program-from-the-scrap-heap/feed/ 2
Higher Launch Angles Result In More Strikeouts http://baseballnews.com/higher-launch-angles-result-in-more-strikeouts/ http://baseballnews.com/higher-launch-angles-result-in-more-strikeouts/#respond Mon, 11 Feb 2019 22:06:57 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12962 By DR. COOP DeRENNE University of Hawaii HONOLULU, Hawaii — We are in the era of analytics and the strikeout. Major League Baseball tracks every pitch and swing for data.  Universities and high schools follow their lead.  Thus, hitting mechanics have been diagnosed, dissected and discussed more than any baseball topic except possibly pitching mechanics.  […]

The post Higher Launch Angles Result In More Strikeouts appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By DR. COOP DeRENNE
University of Hawaii

HONOLULU, Hawaii — We are in the era of analytics and the strikeout. Major League Baseball tracks every pitch and swing for data. 

Universities and high schools follow their lead. 

Thus, hitting mechanics have been diagnosed, dissected and discussed more than any baseball topic except possibly pitching mechanics. 

For the first time in MLB history, there were more strikeouts (41,207) than hits (41,018).

The highest amount of strikeouts in the past 49 years of NCAA Division I baseball took place in 2018 as 7.88 strikeouts per nine innings per game for each team took place. Each of the last four years have featured strikeout numbers that have gone over 7.00 which has never happened before in the past 49 years. 

How should you swing the bat? Research gives us the answer.

Humbly, our research teams at the University of Hawaii have conducted as much scientific research as any group in the country since 1980. 

The best Hall of Fame hitters since 1900 have been analyzed under pure research conditions, using the best high-speed cameras and 3-D motion analysis equipment in the world. 

Wheel Isn’t Broken
Our journey began in the mid-1980s. 

We began the pursuit of using scientific evidence to help provide answers to the following questions:

(a) Biomechanically, how do the best hitters of all-time past and present hit a baseball?

(b) How do we train a hitter to become a more successful hitter?

Our quest for truth led us to Dr. Tom House, pitching coach of the Texas Rangers at the time. 

Together with additional staff, and high-tech equipment, we formed Bio-kinetics, Inc., a think-tank biomechanical research company in Laguna Hills, California. 

In 1987, we began studying Major League hitters and pitchers during live game performances and collected valuable film and video on past and present Hall of Fame hitters and pitchers.  

The analytical process was based on collecting live game performance swings and analyzing these swings using high-speed cameras and the Ariel Computerized Biomechanical Motion Analysis System.  

By using the Ariel System, we were able to measure and analyze the kinematics (time and space factors in the motion) of the hitters’ swings. 

The kinematics included were linear and angular displacements (the change in a body’s location in space in a given direction), velocities and accelerations.

Over the course of the past 32 years, we have been able to categorize hitters into the following sub-categories:

(a) Elite lifetime high average (.300 +) and power (average per year 35 home runs) hitters.

(b) High lifetime average hitters (.330 +).

(c) .275 to .300 average lifetime hitters.

(d) Sub-.250 lifetime hitters.  

As we studied the swings of the players in each sub-category, we were able to identify the common scientific four absolutes of the swing and the common seven swing components residing within the four absolutes that all successful hitters possess. 

To read more of this special report, purchase the Feb. 8, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post Higher Launch Angles Result In More Strikeouts appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/higher-launch-angles-result-in-more-strikeouts/feed/ 0
2019 Draft Preview Of Elite College Players http://baseballnews.com/2019-draft-preview-of-elite-college-players/ Fri, 28 Dec 2018 17:16:19 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12906 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TUCSON, Ariz. — There are 80 elite college players who have an excellent chance of being drafted in the first three rounds of next June’s MLB Draft with a good season in 2019. The list was made after consulting with college baseball coaches across the nation along with scouts. […]

The post 2019 Draft Preview Of Elite College Players appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TUCSON, Ariz. — There are 80 elite college players who have an excellent chance of being drafted in the first three rounds of next June’s MLB Draft with a good season in 2019.

The list was made after consulting with college baseball coaches across the nation along with scouts.

The top two prospects include C Audley Rutschman of Oregon State and 1B Andrew Vaughn of the University of California.

C Adley Rutschman
Oregon State Univ.

Rutschman helped lead Oregon St. to the national title last year.

An ironman as a catcher, he was the Beavers’ secret weapon behind the plate as he worked 67 of 68 games and only allowed 17 stolen bases in 36 attempts.

He is a superb receiver and handles the pitching staff like a pro. This skilled switch hitter put up incredible numbers one year ago.

He hit .408 with 9 homers, 22 doubles and 83 RBI. It’s no wonder he is the leading candidate at this time to be the No. 1 overall pick in the 2019 MLB Draft.

1B Andrew Vaughn
Univ. of California

His 23 home runs last season tied a school record, and Vaughn led the nation in slugging percentage and on-base percentage.

He hit .402 with 14 doubles and 63 RBI.

To read about the other 78 top college prospects, purchase the 2019 College Preview Edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The list includes a number of high profile NCAA Division I players and several junior college players, including RHP Jackson Rutledge from San Jacinto College (TX) who has a 96-98 mph fastball and stands 6-foot-8.

The 2019 College Preview Edition of Collegiate Baseball has 36 pages of information about every level of college baseball and features every pre-season poll, top teams and players on each level. In NCAA Div. I, we an analysis of the top 40 ranked teams and look at every conference with the projected order of finish by teams, Players and Pitchers of The Year in each league and top players from each university, plus our Collegiate Baseball Pre-Season All-American team powered by Diamond Sports. 

To see what else is in this popular edition, CLICK HERE. 

The post 2019 Draft Preview Of Elite College Players appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
Collegiate Baseball’s 2019 HS All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseballs-2019-hs-all-americans/ Thu, 27 Dec 2018 19:00:46 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12942 TUCSON, Ariz. — An all-star lineup of high school players headlines Collegiate Baseball’s 2019 Pre-Season High School All America team powered by Diamond Sports. The players on this list have demonstrated amazing athletic ability and talent in their respective positions and are among the most sought after players by pro scouts and college recruiters. The […]

The post Collegiate Baseball’s 2019 HS All-Americans appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

TUCSON, Ariz. — An all-star lineup of high school players headlines Collegiate Baseball’s 2019 Pre-Season High School All America team powered by Diamond Sports.

The players on this list have demonstrated amazing athletic ability and talent in their respective positions and are among the most sought after players by pro scouts and college recruiters.

The majority of the players have committed to a college and most have received national recognition already. Many are players of the year in their league, region or state last season while several played on Team USA or in prestigious summer events.

All players were nominated by their high school coach and recommended by other coaches in their state.

To read detailed information about each All American, order the January 25, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball. You can subscribe or purchase a single copy by CLICKING HERE.

First Team

Pitchers
Will Bednar, RHP, Mars Area H.S., PA
Dawson Netz, RHP, Maranatha H.S., Pasadena, CA
Tyson Heaton, RHP, Yucaipa H.S., CA
Jason Savacool, RHP, CW Baker H.S., Baldwinsville, NY
Geoffrey Gilbert, LHP, Bishop England H.S., SC
Cooper Benson, LHP, San Luis Obispo H.S., CA
Michael Doolin, RHP, Andrean H.S., Merrillville, IN
Nolan Hudi, LHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Chipper Menard, LHP, New Iberia Senior H.S., LA
AJ Hacker, RHP, Rowan County H.S., Morehead, KY
JJ Goss, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Sam Hliboki, RHP, Harvard-Westlake H.S., Studio City, CA
Hunter Barco, LHP, The Bolles School, FL
Brennan Malone, RHP, IMG Academy, Bradenton, FL
Jacob Meador, RHP, Centennial H.S., Burleson, TX
Jack Leiter, RHP, Delbarton H.S., Morristown, NJ
Zach Morris, LHP, Cabot H.S., AR
Brandon Walker, RHP, North Florida Christian, Tallahassee, FL

Catchers
Matt McCormick,
St. Laurence H.S., Burbank, IL

Ethan Hearn, Mobile Christian H.S., Mobile, AL
Nathan Hickey, Providence H.S., Jacksonville,
Darius Perry, La Mirada H.S., CA
Nick Sizemore, Pryor H.S., OK
Drew Romo, The Woodlands H.S., TX

Infielders
Rece Hinds,
SS, IMG Academy, Bradenton, FL

Parker Noland, 3B, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Brett Baty, 3B, Lake Travis H.S., Austin, TX
Bobby Witt Jr., SS, Colleyville Heritage H.S., TX
Dylan Ray, 3B, Bob Jones H.S., Madison, AL
Landon Cato, 3B/1B, Oak Mountain H.S, Birmingham, AL
Jose Torres, SS, Calvert Hall College H.S., Towson, MD
Paul Christopher “CJ” Abrams, SS/2B, Blessed Trinity H.S., Roswell, GA
Carter Young, SS, Selah H.S., WA
Brooks Lee, SS/2B, San Luis Obispo H.S., CA
Jacob Shaver, INF, Jordan H.S., Sandy, UT
Christian Cairo, SS, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL

Outfielders
Corbin Carroll,
Lakeside School, Seattle, WA

Coleman Brigman, Valley Christian H.S., San Jose, CA
Chris Newell, Malvern Prep, PA
Michael Brueser, Hamilton H.S. Chandler, AZ
Riley Greene, Hagerty H.S., FL
Bryce Matthews, Chaparral H.S., Parker, CO
Pete Crow-Armstrong, Harvard-Westlake H.S., Studio City, CA
Dylan Crews, Lake Mary H.S., FL
Michael Dixon, Berkeley H.S., CA
Maurice Hampton, Memphis University School, TN
Emanuel Dean, Servite H.S., Anaheim, CA

Multi-Position Athletes
Chris Villaman,
LHP/OF, Ledford H.S., Thomasville, NC

Logan Tanner, C/RHP, George County H.S., Lucedale, MS
Jack Everett Washburn, RHP/OF, Webster H.S., WI
Riley Cornelio, RHP/SS, Pine Creek H.S., Colorado Springs, CO
Sam Ireland, RHP/3B, Mountain Vista H.S., Highlands Ranch, CO
Tyler Matyshock, LHP/1B/OF, Sonora H.S., CA
Drew Gilbert, LHP/CF, Stillwater Area H.S., MN
Jared Jones, RHP/OF, La Mirada H.S., CA
Tyler Callihan, SS/RHP, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Blake Adams, RHP/OF, Har-Ber H.S., Springdale, AR
Landon Sims, RHP/OF, South Forsyth H.S., Cumming, GA
Seth Tomczak, RHP/CF, Argonaut H.S., Jackson, CA
Derek Diamond, RHP/INF, Ramona H.S., CA
Spencer Jones, LHP/1B/OF, La Costa Canyon H.S., Carlsbad, CA
Nick Maldonado, RHP/SS, Seton Hall Prep, West Orange, NJ
Cade Doughty, SS/RHP, Denham Springs H.S., LA

Second Team

Pitchers
Chandler Best,
LHP, McGill-Toolen Catholic H.S., Mobile, AL

Nick Durgin, RHP, Melbourne Central Catholic H.S., Melbourne, FL
Zach Jacobs, RHP, San Dimas H.S., CA
John Cashimer, LHP, Coppell H.S., TX
Isaac Duplechain, RHP, Barbe H.S., Lake Charles, LA
Dallas Glass, RHP, Pleasure Ridge Park H.S., Louisville, KY
Carter Rustad, RHP, Staley H.S., Kansas City, MO
Matt Thompson, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Brandon Sproat, RHP, Pace H.S., FL
Josh Emerson, RHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Braden Halladay, RHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Jackson Kimbroll, LHP, Oak Mountain H.S., Birmingham, AL

Catchers
Michael Carpentier,
Yucaipa H.S., CA
Jonathan French,
Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA.
Parker Landwehr,
Calvert Hall College H.S., Towson, MD
Mark Black,
Serra Catholic H.S., McKeesport, PA
Jared Alvarez-Lopez,
Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Parker Nelson,
Madison Central H.S., MS

Infielders
Anthony Volpe,
SS, Delbarton H.S., Morristown, NJ
Kyren Paris,
SS, Freedom H.S., Oakley, CA
Cody Freeman,
SS/2B, Etiwanda H.S., Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Connor Beichler, SS, Owasso H.S., OK
Max Anderson, SS/2B, Millard West H.S., Omaha, NE
Grant Hotchkiss, INF, Boyle County H.S., Danville, KY

Outfielders
Dillon Besnier,
Tampa Riverview H.S., Riverview, FL
Austin Hendrick,
West Alleghany H.S., PA

Kendall Pettis, Brother Rice H.S., Chicago, IL
Cam Thompson, Owasso H.S., OK
Sam Thompson, Owasso H.S., OK

Multiple Position Athletes
Xavier Carter,
1B/OF/LHP, Capital Christian H.S., Sacramento, CA

Cy Nielson, LHP/OF, Spanish Fork H.S., UT
Nathan LaRue, C/OF/RHP, McGill-Toolen Catholic H.S., Mobile, AL
Peyton Lejeune, SS/RHP, Teurlings Catholic H.S., Lafayette, LA
Cam Hill, 1B/LHP, Bob Jones H.S., Madison, AL
Caden Rose, SS/RHP, Bob Jones H.S., Madison, AL
Joe Naranjo, 1B/LHP, Ayala H.S., Chino Hills, CA
Jared Townsend, LHP/1B, Wilton H.S., IA
Ben Schoneman, RHP/INF, La Cueva H.S., Albuquerque, NM
Rhett Gallagher, RHP/C, Van Alstyne H.S., TX
Collin McCrabb, RHP/SS/1B/OF, Wilton H.S., IA

The post Collegiate Baseball’s 2019 HS All-Americans appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
Mike Martin Has Seen It All At Florida St. http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-has-seen-it-all-at-florida-st/ http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-has-seen-it-all-at-florida-st/#respond Mon, 24 Dec 2018 18:10:57 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12891 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Mike Martin, the winningest head coach in college baseball history, will cap a remarkable 40-year coaching career in 2019 at Florida St. University. He only needs 13 more victories to be the first college coach in any sport to collect 2,000 wins. What many people don’t […]

The post Mike Martin Has Seen It All At Florida St. appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Mike Martin, the winningest head coach in college baseball history, will cap a remarkable 40-year coaching career in 2019 at Florida St. University.

He only needs 13 more victories to be the first college coach in any sport to collect 2,000 wins.

What many people don’t realize is that he started his head coaching career with two straight losses at Miami (Fla.), 10-0 and 4-3 and wondered what he had got himself into.

In game three, his team quickly fell behind Miami 8-2 as he made wholesale substitutions with his team and faced the real possibility of starting his FSU head coaching career 0-3.

Incredibly, the Seminoles, still trailing 8-2 heading into the seventh, scored seven runs over the last three innings for Martin’s first win as the skipper at Florida St., 9-8 and included a 3-run homer by Mike Yastrzemski in the ninth for the game winner.

Florida State ultimately went 51-12 during the 1980 season as the Seminoles won 18 of their next 19 games after those two losses at Miami.

Martin led Florida State to 50 or more wins 12 consecutive years to start his head coaching career.

Entering the 2019 season, he has a 1,987-713-4 overall record. Martin has the best winning percentage among active head baseball coaches, sporting a .736 mark to go along with 16 trips to the College World Series and 39 consecutive regional appearances.

Of the 3,981 baseball games played in FSU history, Martin has been involved in 3,088 of those in some capacity as a player or coach. He has been on the field or in the dugout for 2,271 of the Seminoles’ 2,887 all-time victories.

Collegiate Baseball will delve into wild experiences he has had in his career, including the time a bus driver died of a heart attack as his team was traveling in San Francisco on a 7-lane highway enroute to play Stanford.

His 2001 Florida St. ball club embarked on a cross-country trip to California and landed at San Francisco International Airport prior to a series at Stanford.

A charter bus picked up the team and began driving on a 7-lane freeway when the unthinkable happened.

The bus driver suffered a fatal heart attack as he slumped over to his right with his foot still on the accelerator…but nobody driving the bus.

Martin and Chip Baker, the team’s Director of Operations, gained control of the bus and guided it safely to the side of the freeway.

Martin and Baker were presented with the university’s prestigious Westcott Award for their bravery in saving the lives of players and staff.

Imagine being one of 27 college baseball players on this bus who just watched a man die.

“That situation is still vivid in my mind after all these years,” said Martin.

“We had left the airport in San Francisco to play Stanford on a charter bus and were headed toward the San Francisco Giants’ new ball park at the time, Pac Bell Park.

“I knew old Candlestick Park was on the way, and the bus driver said it was about 10 minutes ahead on the right.

“So I asked (assistant coach) Chip Baker to tell the players to look off to the right side of the bus in a few minutes because the old park the Giants played in will be there.

“Chip starts telling the players to be aware of this famous stadium on the right hand side and then turns around and asks the bus driver if he is OK because the bus wasn’t traveling straight.

“I am in the first seat to the right of the bus driver and look over at him. The top part of his body was literally learning to the right with his hands off the steering wheel going down a 7-lane freeway!

“All I could think about at that moment was somebody had to stop this bus. I jumped up and started trying to pull his leg off the accelerator. I couldn’t pull it off at first.

“Finally, I just went into a rage and jerked his foot off of that accelerator. While I was doing this, Chip grabbed the steering wheel and sat in the lap of the driver.

“So I just sat down at that point. Chip slowed the bus down and as he brought it to a stop.

“Our trainer started administering CPR to the bus driver as soon as he could.

“I remember getting off the bus and realizing what could have happened. If we had lost control of the bus, it could have easily gone into the bay along the right hand side of the highway and who knows how many could have been injured or died.

“As I was walking from the bus, I broke down and started crying. It hit me what the gravity of the situation was. What in the world would I have done if we lost one or more of our guys? That would have been a tragedy. We were driving 60 mph when all this happened and survived without a mishap.”

Baker vividly remembers that frightening ordeal as if it happened yesterday.

“As the bus was traveling on the freeway toward San Francisco, the bay was directly to the right of the freeway.

“I always sit behind the driver on charter bus trips like this, and I turned around and told our players that Candlestick Park would be along the right in a few minutes.

“My five-year-old daughter was in my lap, and the next thing you know I noticed the bus driver leaning over to the right. I thought he was trying to get me a map or something.

“He had a widow maker with a massive heart attack. Keep in mind there are no guard rails along the right side of the freeway.

“There were rocks, trees and then water. Fortunately, I grabbed the wheel and straightened the direction of the bus and got on the driver’s lap. Mike (Martin) got the foot of the driver off the accelerator.

“It was amazing that at 1:15 p.m. on the 101 Freeway to San Francisco, every car in front of us disappeared. Cars behind us did not pass us because the bus was wobbling until I got control of the steering wheel. Fortunately we got the bus to the side of the road without a horrible tragedy happening.”

To read more of this story and the interesting situations that Mike Martin has had during his career, purchase the Jan. 4, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post Mike Martin Has Seen It All At Florida St. appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-has-seen-it-all-at-florida-st/feed/ 0
Mitchell McCrary Endures Injury Torture http://baseballnews.com/mitchell-mccrary-endures-injury-torture/ http://baseballnews.com/mitchell-mccrary-endures-injury-torture/#respond Mon, 24 Dec 2018 18:09:01 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12894 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball DURHAM, N.C. — On April Fools day in 2017, Mitchell McCrary of North Carolina Central was drilled in the face by a 90 mph fastball while trying to bunt. He was rushed to Duke University Hospital, and surgery was performed to repair three separate breaks in his jaw as […]

The post Mitchell McCrary Endures Injury Torture appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

DURHAM, N.C. — On April Fools day in 2017, Mitchell McCrary of North Carolina Central was drilled in the face by a 90 mph fastball while trying to bunt.

He was rushed to Duke University Hospital, and surgery was performed to repair three separate breaks in his jaw as blood was pouring out of his mouth.

McCrary’s mouth was wired shut for a month and a half. Then his mouth was half wired for another four weeks.

He couldn’t eat normally as he craved anything that he could chew and had to cope with drinking his food for months.

Liquified food was sucked through a straw placed in front of his teeth next to his cheek as it seeped through small openings between his teeth and into his throat.

It was agonizing and torture.

Ultimately, he would endure another surgery on his jaw. Prior to this setback, he had to overcome labrum surgery to both shoulders.

“I found myself filling my heart with hatred and depression,” said McCrary.

“Hate, that it was me who was given this obstacle to overcome. Hate, that I was waking up each day knowing I wasn’t going to suit up with my brothers for the rest of the season.

“Depressed that my season had been cut short once again to injury.”

“Depressed to the point where I ostracized myself away from friends and family. I spent weeks talking with a psychologist about life, baseball and trying to find that inner peace that I had been longing for since the incident.”

Prior to the injury, McCrary made 26 appearances and 25 starts during the 2017 season and was batting .352 with 32 hits and reached base safely in every game.

He had a .438 on-base percentage and a .451 slugging percentage.

“We were playing a home game that day. In the third inning, we had runners on first and second with no outs.

“I stepped up to the plate and tried to move them over with a sacrifice bunt. I am a lefthanded hitter and squared around against a pitcher from Florida A&M (JoJo Durden) who was a lefty.

“When the pitch came out of his hand, I knew it wasn’t going to be in the strike zone immediately. My initial reaction was to turn away from the pitch as it was coming inside.

“But I couldn’t react quickly enough as a 90 mph fastball cracked me on the right side of my jaw.

“I immediately fell to the ground. I knew something was horrifically wrong with my mouth because it was completely contorted because of three broken bones in my jaw.

“I could feel some teeth in the back of my mouth that were broken from the impact of the blow. Two teeth were chipped in the back on top.

“One was chipped on the bottom in the very back as well.

To read more of this article, order the 2019 College Preview Issue of Collegiate Baseball (Jan. 4, 2019) or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The post Mitchell McCrary Endures Injury Torture appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/mitchell-mccrary-endures-injury-torture/feed/ 0
2019 Pre-Season Collegiate Baseball Rankings http://baseballnews.com/2019-collegiate-baseball-pre-season-polls/ Mon, 24 Dec 2018 18:07:04 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12873 xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxxxx NCAA Division 1 NCAA Division 2 NCAA Division 3 NAIA NJCAA Division 1 NJCAA Division 2 NJCAA Division 3 California Community College Northwest Junior Colleges   Collegiate Baseball’s 36-page 2019 College Baseball Preview Edition (Jan. 4, 2019) has just been published and features all the top teams and players on […]

The post 2019 Pre-Season Collegiate Baseball Rankings appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

xxxxxx

xxxxxx

xxxxxx

xxxxxx

xxxxxxxx

NCAA Division 1

NCAA Division 2

NCAA Division 3

NAIA

NJCAA Division 1

NJCAA Division 2

NJCAA Division 3

California Community College

Northwest Junior Colleges

 

Collegiate Baseball’s 36-page 2019 College Baseball Preview Edition (Jan. 4, 2019) has just been published and features all the top teams and players on all levels of college baseball plus a look at the top 80 college baseball players for the 2019 MLB Draft. To order this edition or subscribe, CLICK HERE.

To read what is included in this issue, CLICK HERE.

 

The post 2019 Pre-Season Collegiate Baseball Rankings appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
Unlocking More Power In Hitting Is Important http://baseballnews.com/unlocking-more-power-in-hitting-is-important/ http://baseballnews.com/unlocking-more-power-in-hitting-is-important/#respond Mon, 24 Dec 2018 18:01:41 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12899 By PERRY HUSBAND Special To Collegiate Baseball (Final Of A 2-Part Series) PALMDALE, Calif. — Settling for less than maximum exit velocity in hitting is criminal.  If you are a high school or collegiate hitter in the 70’s or 80’s in tee exit velocity, you have some immediate testing to do. It takes about 90 […]

The post Unlocking More Power In Hitting Is Important appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>

By PERRY HUSBAND
Special To Collegiate Baseball
(Final Of A 2-Part Series)

PALMDALE, Calif. — Settling for less than maximum exit velocity in hitting is criminal. 

If you are a high school or collegiate hitter in the 70’s or 80’s in tee exit velocity, you have some immediate testing to do. It takes about 90 mph to leave the yard, and that has to be the very beginning level that you seek.

During my training days with amateur hitters before discovering effective velocity, we routinely had high school hitters in the mid 90’s and always some at 100 mph.

Many of those reached that level with a wood bat, off the tee.

Exit velocity is a precise formula of efficient movements. 

Not every player will reach the mid-90’s, but I believe that every good athlete should be at least at 90 mph off the tee as an upper level high school athlete. 

You won’t do it by using an ice skater and a boxer as an example of how to swing a bat at a ball. We experimented with a junior college team for three weeks. 

We started with one hitter at 100 mph and ended with 10 hitters in that club. 

This speaks to making better movements, not getting stronger in three weeks. 

If the ice skater science actually applied to the swing, wouldn’t we want to swing about a six inch bat? If bringing everything in closer to the body speeds things up so much, the shorter the bat, the faster the bat.

According to experts, bat speed is everything. I, however, disagree. It is one thing of many that creates the very complex movement that is a baseball swing.  

Bryce Harper’s lead arm is completely locked out at impact and well before. All the rubber bands have released the energy at or close to max levels. 

That’s why all the hardest hit balls include these type of stretching movements. Bryce consistently has the lead arm locked with great bat lag angle well before impact. This engages the big muscles that pull the bat into maximum bat speed.

Pushing the bat will never create the same exit velocity.

Try this simple experiment to understand the difference between pulling the bat into action and pushing it. 

Put your hand flat on a hard surface. With your index finger, lift it up and slam it down.

Now using your other hand, lift the middle finger off the table until you feel the tension of pulling it backwards, then release it quickly. 

The slam of the middle finger should show you how completely obvious the difference is. 

Pulling the middle finger back and releasing it is the same as stretching the lead arm and abs and then releasing them, like a rubber band.

This is why the only real comparison to the baseball swing is the golf swing, with the obvious differences. 

To read more of this in-depth article, order the 2019 College Preview Issue of Collegiate Baseball (Jan. 4, 2019) or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

Perry Husband explains heavy ball training, why 100 percent swing mechanics are rare, his live batting practice test and what tee test data shows, plus much more.

The post Unlocking More Power In Hitting Is Important appeared first on Collegiate Baseball Newspaper.

]]>
http://baseballnews.com/unlocking-more-power-in-hitting-is-important/feed/ 0