Collegiate Baseball Newspaper http://baseballnews.com Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:29:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.9 4 Remarkable College Baseball Players http://baseballnews.com/4-remarkable-college-baseball-players/ http://baseballnews.com/4-remarkable-college-baseball-players/#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:37:23 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10437 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TUCSON, Ariz. — Over the course of covering college baseball the last 46 years, I have come across some of the most unique people you could ever imagine. Here are four of my favorites. Pitcher Jason Haynie South Carolina Ever hear of a pitcher who performs a fire-breathing as […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TUCSON, Ariz. — Over the course of covering college baseball the last 46 years, I have come across some of the most unique people you could ever imagine.

Here are four of my favorites.

Pitcher Jason Haynie
South Carolina

Ever hear of a pitcher who performs a fire-breathing as well as fire-eating act?

From 1993-1996, Jason Haynie of the University of South Carolina was not only an incredible pitcher for the Gamecocks but a diverse entertainer who also juggled and performed sleight of hand.

His fire act always brought down the house which he performed at numerous hotels.

“Fire eating is when you take a stick on fire and bring it inside your mouth to put out the flame,” explained Haynie during the 1994 interview with Collegiate Baseball.

“Fire breathing is different. You take charcoal lighter fluid and pour it in your mouth. You have a torch in front of your mouth and spit out the lighter fluid as far as you can. The flames have erupted outward as far as 10 feet with a huge ball of fire.”

Haynie, who stressed people should not try fire eating or breathing unless they are well trained, said that butane is the fuel of choice when fire eating.

“The reason you use butane is that the fuel is the only thing that burns. I usually pour butane on a wire hanger wrapped with gauze and tied on with dental floss. I light it on fire, and then touch my tongue with the butane-coated gauze. My tongue is momentarily on fire, but it goes out very quickly. Before the butane burns off my tongue, another torch is lit by my tongue. People come away impressed with part of the act.

Haynie said his mouth was never coated with anything special to prevent the fire from scorching it.

His fire act was extremely dangerous to perform.

“You should never breathe in while you are fire eating because you might damage your lungs. The butane may run down your throat into your lungs, and then you would be in trouble.”

He injured himself while a photographer was shooting him and two other players for the back cover of the 1994 South Carolina media guide.

“I was fire breathing and spit out lighter fluid as usual into a torch of fire. This big ball of fire came out. But because it was a windy day, my left eye lash caught on fire.”

David Stevens
Wickenburg H.S. (Ariz.)

David Stevens is one of the most unbelievable baseball players the game has ever seen.

When he played for Wickenburg High School (Wickenburg, Ariz.) from 1981-1984, he played his favorite sport without legs (see photo of him attempting to pitch on page 5).

He was a thalidomide baby, born with stumps instead of legs.

During his high school career, he ran by utilizing the palms of his hands as feet and his leg stubs, one a misshapen foot with two toes, the other several inches of fused toes.

It goes without saying that he played with grit and determin-ation.

His story could have been tragic, but David’s indomitable spirit, to the amazement of everyone he knows, lifted him to remarkable deeds.

At birth, he was given a slim chance of living without brain damage. He defied the odds. His mother, believed to be 15 or 16 years of age at the time, abandoned David in a Phoenix hospital.

Fortunately, a loving couple by the name of Bill and Bee Stevens adopted young David at the hospital.

During his high school career, he normally walked on artificial legs. But as an athlete in football, wrestling and basketball, he used the palm of his hands and his leg stubs as legs.

Here is a sample of his athletic drive during his athletic career at Wickenburg H.S.:

  • During a junior varsity football season, he played nose guard in eight games. He was involved in seven unassisted tackles and one quarterback sack.
  • As a first-year wrestler, he registered an amazing 10-11 record.
  • He bench pressed 208 pounds through his sophomore year.
  • Once during a physical education basketball class, he scored 22 points.

So it wasn’t a case where coaches or students felt sorry for David. He had legitimate athletic talent.

In baseball games, he was normally put into games in the late innings of tight games because he draws walks. His strike zone begins about one inch above home plate and extends eight inches above that.

Stepping to the plate, he used a 27 ounce aluminum bat that was about 2 ½ feet long. In seven plate appearances during his sophomore year, he walked five times, cracked a base hit and struck out once.

He ran with remarkable speed from home to first base on any hit balls or walks for that matter.

He hustled more than anyone on the team. And because of the physical abuse that his hands took, the skin on each hand was as tough as boot leather.

On occasion, he played right field for Wickenburg H.S. and actually swiped two bases and knocked in a run for the junior varsity and varsity squads.

On one of his steals, he outscrambled the throw to second base by diving head first into the bag.

Life was not perfect for David. One time he was unceremoniously stuffed in a locker at school by a jerk.

But for the vast majority of the time, life was good for this remarkable young man.

No other athlete I have interviewed in the last 46 years stacks up to the inspirational level as this young man. Not even close.

Pitcher Jamie Bluma
Wichita State

This gentleman is the wildest free spirit I ever met. After all, this is a man who:

  • Licked bugs off the grill of the team bus while on a trip from the University of Arkansas to Wichita, Kan. during his freshman season after teammates dared him to do it for $20.
  • During a series with Bradley, Bluma was dared by pitcher Jason Jordan to eat a medium sized nightcrawler. Bluma obliged and received a hot dog as payment for services rendered.
  • He put a live moth in his mouth and put it under his lip as if he were dipping tobacco.
  • Early during one season at Wichita St., he and his bullpen crew captured several mice, played with them for about five innings and then “terminated” them.
  • He once captured a toad in the bullpen during a regional game and promptly put a leash on it.
  • To make the toad comfortable, he constructed a habitat where he and other pitchers in the bullpen constructed a miniature pond complete with grass, trees (from weeds), aquatic animals (plastic turtle and toad), and bridge (made of stretched out gum).

Bluma added a final human element to the magnificent engineering feat.

He threw in a touch of garbage (small paper crumpled up) so that no one could mistake this area as virgin land never inhabited by man.

He carried around an intriguing mix of plastic creatures during his Wichita State career, including a rat named “Scroogie,” a turtle named “Changeup,” and a snake called “Gaaas.”

In his collection of bizarre creatures were plastic cockroaches and a chicken.

The most famous part of his plastic creature collection was a 1 ½ foot long green grasshopper and a plastic baby doll. He took the head off the baby doll and transferred it to the top of the grasshopper’s head (see photo below).

Having a plastic baby head located on a grasshopper is something to behold. He actually hung this creature from the ceiling of the dugout during the College World Series in games involving Wichita St.

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that Silence Of The Lambs was one of Bluma’s all-time favorite movies and the psychotic character in the movie, Hannibal Lecter, his favorite character.

1B Bryant Winslow
Wichita State

This young man was without a doubt the most courageous baseball player I have ever interviewed.

Who else would play the last few weeks of the 1989 college baseball season with not only a sore shoulder, sore elbow and pulled groin muscle but a broken leg (stress fracture of his right leg).

When the Shockers qualified for the 1989 College World Series (which they eventually won), he hobbled around the confines of Rosenblatt Stadium for Wichita State’s first five games of the CWS with a lump so severe that he grimaced in pain when any weight was put on his broken right leg which was heavily taped for each game.

During the fifth inning of the national championship game against Texas, Longhorn runner Lance Jones collided with Bryant at first base after a throw from third baseman Mikes Jones pulled Winslow off the bag and into the first base line.

Both players sprawled to the ground in pain. After a few minutes, Jones brushed the dirt off his jersey and seemed to be okay.

But Bryant (see photo above, right) was on his back near the coaching box at first base in excruciating pain as he held his right leg for approximately five minutes.

He was helped up by Shocker Coach Gene Stephenson. But any weight put on the leg caused intense pain to Bryant.

His already fractured right leg was now broken in another spot — on the fibula bone as X-rays would reveal after the game. In addition, he broke his left wrist.

But despite having three broken bones now, he pleaded with Shocker Head Coach Gene Stephenson to stay in the game.

Winslow brokered a deal with Stephenson to let him stay out there for at least that inning.

After Winslow took his position at first base and pitcher Greg Brummett delivered a pitch to the batter, Winslow called time and slowly hobbled toward the Wichita State dugout located along the third base line as he was eventually helped to the dugout.

To read more great stories like this, subscribe to Collegiate Baseball by CLICKING HERE.

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Utilizing Dual Position Athletes Properly http://baseballnews.com/utilizing-dual-position-athletes-properly/ http://baseballnews.com/utilizing-dual-position-athletes-properly/#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 21:51:42 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10433 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Brian O’Connor is one of the elite coaches in baseball at the University of Virginia. Entering his 15th year at the helm, he led the Cavaliers to their first national title in 2015 along with four overall appearances at the College World Series and 14 consecutive […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Brian O’Connor is one of the elite coaches in baseball at the University of Virginia.

Entering his 15th year at the helm, he led the Cavaliers to their first national title in 2015 along with four overall appearances at the College World Series and 14 consecutive NCAA tournament appearances.

He enters 2018 with a career record of 639-239-2.

Over the years, his ball clubs have featured baseball players who are tremendous athletes that not only pitch but play a position on the field and hit.

Five of the best include:

  • LHP/1B Joe Koshansky (sixth round draft pick in 2004 by Colorado).
  • LHP/1B Sean Doolittle (first round draft pick in 2007 by Oakland).
  • LHP/DH/1B Danny Hultzen (first round pick in 2011 by Seattle).
  • RHP/DH/3B Nick Howard (first round pick in 2014 by Reds).
  • OF/LHP Adam Haseley (first round pick in 2017 by Phillies).

If you look at the landscape of college baseball today, it is rare to see dual position athletes like this.

Most who are able to pitch and also play another position and hit are asked to specialize in only one position when they get to college. They rarely are allowed to pitch, hit and play a position on the field defensively.

Decades ago, the best college programs in the USA featured dual position players like this, and programs thrived with these special athletes.

In this question and answer session, O’Connor explains why athletes should be given a chance to showcase their skills if they are able to play multiple positions on the collegiate level.

COLLEGIATE BASEBALL: Virginia has had some marvelous dual position athletes since you took over the program who can pitch, hit and play a position on the field. This was common years ago in college baseball. But now you rarely see coaches allow players to do this. They prefer to have players only pitch or play a position on the field. Why?

O’CONNOR: Some of it has been circumstance. When we first got to Virginia 15 years ago, we had a player by the name of Joe Koshansky who was the starting first baseman and a lefthanded pitcher for Virginia the previous season. He became the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of The Year, was in our starting rotation and hit in the middle of the lineup. He wound up being a Major Leaguer. We have been fortunate to have a successful line of these guys. The interesting thing about each one of them, for the most part, is that sometimes the industry of baseball doesn’t know yet what some of these guys might be the best at. Let’s look at Sean Doolittle who is the closer for the Washington Nationals. When we recruited him out of high school, nobody knew whether he would be a pitcher or hitter. Most schools were recruiting him as a pitcher. We recruited him as a dual player. After three years with Virginia, he was a first round draft choice as a hitter. As it turned out, because of knee surgeries and issues, he now is in the Big Leagues as a pitcher. The way recruiting is where recruits commit earlier and earlier, there are a lot of kids who pitch for their high school teams and also are position players who hit. Frankly, I’m not smart enough to know what they should specialize in yet. If it is in the best interests of them and the team, having them continue to be a dual player, if they can manage it, is a good thing.

CB: While college baseball always has a few of these tremendous athletes every year, there is no doubt that the numbers have shrunk over the last 40 years in college baseball as the game has become comprised of specialists who do one thing.

O’CONNOR: I can tell you that we don’t actively try to recruit players who are great pitchers who also are skilled hitters and defensive players. However, we have been fortunate to have some great ones in our program over the years. It’s worked out. But to be honest, it’s becoming harder and harder to do because so many kids are becoming specialized even on the high school level. There are so many 15 and 16-year-old pitchers who might only want to pitch. And that’s all they do. That’s fine. Even someone like Pavin Smith who was a first round pick out of our program last year by the Diamondbacks, out of high school there were as many people who liked him as a pitcher as much as a position player. When he came to Virginia, he ended up being a position player and ended up being a first round pick in that role. There really have been five elite guys in our program over the years who excelled at this in LHP/1B Joe Koshansky, LHP/1B Sean Doolittle, LHP/DH/1B Danny Hultzen, RHP/DH/3B Nick Howard and most recently OF/LHP Adam Haseley.

CB: I am curious if dual position athletes like this are at their best when they are allowed to pitch, hit and play a defensive position. If they are told to only pitch or only play a position and hit, have you seen dual position athletes like this perform worse?

O’CONNOR: I would think baseball people would love performing all of these skills on a regular basis. If you think about it, the competitiveness that it takes to do both is what makes special athletes like this excel. They know what it takes to step in that batter’s box at this level or take the mound against tremendous hitters and field as well. Competitors know what it is like on both sides. He knows what it’s like to face a great pitcher with two strikes on him with the winning run on second late in a game or being on the mound having to throw a strike or make a big pitch. I think it can be a real advantage for a player.

To read more of this question and answer session, purchase the Feb. 9, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. The rest of the article delves more deeply into the area of multiple position athletes on baseball teams.

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Ultimate Process For Calling Pitches In Games http://baseballnews.com/ultimate-process-calling-pitches-games/ http://baseballnews.com/ultimate-process-calling-pitches-games/#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 21:00:21 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10429 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TUCSON, Ariz. — What is the ultimate process for arriving at an ideal pitch mix against opponent hitters? If you analyze and implement a plan for every facet of what is involved, you have given your pitcher a great chance for success. In talking to great pitching coaches over […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TUCSON, Ariz. — What is the ultimate process for arriving at an ideal pitch mix against opponent hitters?

If you analyze and implement a plan for every facet of what is involved, you have given your pitcher a great chance for success.

In talking to great pitching coaches over the years dating back to the early 1970s, here is what the best in the business have done.

What Is The Strike Zone?
This sounds like the most obvious question in the world.

But how many college and high school coaches in baseball make a serious effort to find out the precise strike zone of each home plate umpire they face?

Most coaches simply deal with the strike zone once the game starts and adjust from that point.

The reality is strike zones are all over the map which drive coaches, hitters and pitchers mad. Some zones are incredibly small while others are as large as the Grand Canyon.

In Major League Baseball, many teams get a readout before every game on what the strike zone will be of the home plate umpire working that day and where he likes to call strikes.

It stands to reason that college and high school coaches would want this valuable information as well and keep detailed records of what each home plate umpire likes to call a strike.

Strangely, very few coaches take the time to track this vital information that will help their pitchers and hitters thrive.

Progressive coaches should have a diagram of the strike zone for every home plate umpire they face broken into right and lefthanded batters.

The reality is that the strike zone slightly changes with every home plate umpire depending on whether a right or left handed batter steps to the plate.

An umpire with proper mechanics typically positions his head on the side of the catcher’s head that the batter is hitting from.

When a righthanded batter comes to the plate, the umpire’s head is behind and to the left of the catcher’s head. When a lefthanded hitter steps into the box, the ump switches to the right side of the catcher’s head.

In most cases, strikes are correctly called on the inside edge of the plate. But outside strikes are much more difficult to see for an umpire.

Some umpires have the skill to call consistent strikes on the outside edge of the zone while others don’t.

Knowing what the precise zone is for right and lefthanded batters for each umpire is essential.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have your starting pitcher warm up prior to a game with the knowledge that he will be throwing to a dime-sized strike zone and knows precisely what that umpire likes to call strikes? That goes for every pitcher who follows in that game as well. Your hitters will benefit as well knowing that zone prior to a game.

If you have a home plate with a gigantic strike zone, then why not work on exploiting that big zone to its fullest prior to a game in the bullpen. Some umps even like to call strikes off the plate. Knowledge will help exploit those tendencies to your advantage.

If a coach knows which home plate umpire will be working the next game, then pitchers can work on exploiting the zone in practice.

That’s why knowing the strike zone is No. 1 in our book.

To read more of this article, purchase the Feb. 9, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball by CLICKING HERE.

Seven other important areas are covered in the article, including receiving pitches properly, scouting an opponent, what to look for with 26 stance and swing characteristics observed by Jerry Weinstein, value of effective velocity, how pitch selection evolves and statistical data.

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Mountain Miracle Takes Place In Colorado http://baseballnews.com/mountain-miracle-takes-place-colorado/ http://baseballnews.com/mountain-miracle-takes-place-colorado/#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:07:48 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10424 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball ESTES PARK, Colo. — Miracles happen in life. Clay Engel is lucky to be alive after suffering a skull fracture, fractured vertebra and leg injuries which required skin grafts during a serious hiking accident last summer. The 6-foot-3, 205-pound first baseman at Drury University had just finished his freshman […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

ESTES PARK, Colo. — Miracles happen in life.

Clay Engel is lucky to be alive after suffering a skull fracture, fractured vertebra and leg injuries which required skin grafts during a serious hiking accident last summer.

The 6-foot-3, 205-pound first baseman at Drury University had just finished his freshman season in 2017 with the Panthers and was preparing to play summer ball for the Denver Generals of the Mile High Collegiate Baseball League.

“I drove to Denver the last week in May and was really looking forward to being in that area of the country,” said Engel who is from Ozark, Mo.

“I was excited about being in the mountains but only got to play two games before the accident.”

Engel, who enjoys hiking back home, was in Denver for about a week and realized that he had a great opportunity in the coming days.

“I was staying with a family in Denver. I also had a job being an umpire beside my playing duties.

“I thought it would be a lot of fun to hike in Estes Park which is about two hours from Denver and close to Fort Collins where I would be umpiring in several days.

“I drove to Fort Collins which was my first day umpiring. I umpired games in the morning and afternoon. After I finished work, I got some dinner.  Instead of driving back to Denver which was 1 1/2 hours away, I drove to Estes Park which was only 30 minutes away on June 2 at about 6 p.m.

“I got into Estes Park and took my time surveying the area. There was a full moon out so you could see quite a bit of the area.

“I parked on the side of the road at about 9 p.m., got out and hiked up the mountain which was a little more than a mile up. It was a nice, upward climb but not too difficult.”

Engel said he didn’t hike with anybody else.

“I had camping gear on my back which included food, water and a hammock to sleep in. I didn’t wear a head lamp on my forehead since there was a full moon that evening. It was night time, but the area was lit up enough for me to see where I was going.

“I have done a lot of hiking in the past in Springfield, Mo. and also in northern Arkansas. But I had never hiked in the Rocky Mountains before.

“The area I was hiking in was mountainous and rocky but there were trees all the way up. It was more or less like a forest that I was walking through as I started my ascent.

“I was looking forward to spending that evening and the next day in this area. There are a lot of things to do.”

Engel said when he arrived near the top of the mountain, it was like a bluff which had exposed rocks.

“It took about 2 1/2 hours to get there, and now it was about 11:30 p.m.”

To read more of this article, purchase the Feb. 9, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball by CLICKING HERE.

It talks about how he became stranded on the mountain and couldn’t come down and ultimately fell as he was seriously injured as he was unconscious for six hours. It also explains how he was able to get off the mountain and get help despite having a skull fracture, vertebra fracture and serious leg injury as he ultimately received help and was operated on at a local hospital. His amazing recovery is also explained.  

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Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 H.S. Pre-Season Poll http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseballs-2018-h-s-pre-season-poll/ Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:46:42 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10368 TUCSON, Ariz. — American Heritage High School (Plantation, Fla.) is ranked No. 1 in Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 Pre-Season National High School Poll. The Patriots feature a ball club that has 10 high profile NCAA Division I commits. Two of the top hitters in the nation return in 3B/RHP Triston Casas (Miami, Fla. commit, .446, 4 […]

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TUCSON, Ariz. — American Heritage High School (Plantation, Fla.) is ranked No. 1 in Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 Pre-Season National High School Poll.

The Patriots feature a ball club that has 10 high profile NCAA Division I commits.

Two of the top hitters in the nation return in 3B/RHP Triston Casas (Miami, Fla. commit, .446, 4 HR, 5 2B, 18 RBI) and 2B/RHP Cory Acton (Florida commit, .470, 7 HR, 5 2B, 3 3B, 26 RBI).

Other high profile players include (with college they are committed to):

  • LHP Bailey Mantilla (Miami, Fla.).
  • LHP Ryan Cabarcas (Florida).
  • CF Enrique Bradfield (Vanderbilt).
  • SS/RHP Jordan Carrion (Florida).
  • 3B Gio Ferraro (Miami, Fla.).
  • LHP Devin Futrell (Vanderbilt).
  • 1B Gavin Casas (Vanderbilt).
  • C Julio Cortez (South Florida).

“This is the deepest team I have ever had at American Heritage,” said Head Coach Bruce Aven who played 10 years in the Major Leagues and has coached the Patriots the past six seasons.

“In 2012, we had an exceptional team with six or seven ending up playing professional baseball. We had a first rounder in Zach Collins and a second and third rounder as well.”

American Heritage, which posted a 20-7 overall record last season, is obviously loaded with talent but will undoubtedly play with a chip on its shoulder after bowing out of the playoffs last season with a first round loss.

“When we were knocked out of the playoffs in the first round last year, it was a shock to everybody. We were one of the best teams in the state of Florida and didn’t hit and made uncharacteristic errors that particular playoff game. The other team played better than us and deserved to win.

“Our guys have been waiting for the opportunity to play this season with that bad memory driving them. It was an experience that they can learn from.

“With that being said, we have a bunch of players who are humble and work hard. They have a special drive to get better. They have learned from that loss that they must play every single pitch and win the process which results in good things happening.”

Tristan Casas is one of the top high school player in the country.

“I don’t know many 17-year-olds who have been part of three gold medal winning ball clubs with Team USA. He has succeeded at everything he has done. What makes him special is that he has done it with the utmost respect for the game and has a great work ethic.

“Potentially he is a top five pick in the Major League Draft next June. While that is obviously important, he also wants to win a state title. It would mean a great deal to him.”

What also makes this team unique is that several players can play multiple positions.

“Cory will move around as well as Triston. We don’t really have a set lineup yet because there are different players who can perform defensively at different positions. That’s another plus with this team.”

The pitching staff goes six deep with everyone committed to Florida, Miami (Fla.) or Vanderbilt.

“I have had staffs throw harder in the past, but the guys we have can really pitch, and all of them utilize three pitches each.

“That is really rare on a high school pitching staff. You are lucky to get guys to command a fastball. But everyone has multiple pitches with exceptional command,” said Aven.

For information on all the top 30 teams in the poll, read the full story in the January 26, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball. This issue also includes the Collegiate Baseball 2018 Pre-Season All-Americans and a state-by-state list of top high school players. You can subscribe or purchase a single copy of Collegiate Baseball by CLICKING HERE.

Collegiate Baseball’s National H.S. Pre-Season Poll
(As of Jan. 19, 2018)

 Rank   School    City/State 2017 Record 
  1. American Heritage (Plantation, FL) 20-7
  2. Orange Lutheran (Orange, CA) 18-12
  3. Cypress Ranch (Cypress, TX) 27-8
  4. The Bolles School (Jacksonville, FL) 21-10
  5. Cathedral Catholic (San Diego, CA) 25-9
  6. Pleasure Ridge Park (Louisville, KY) 40-5
  7. Valley Christian (San Jose, CA) 22-10-1
  8. Rockwall-Heath (Rockwall, TX) 33-10
  9. Loganville (Loganville, GA) 30-13
10. Farragut (Knoxville, TN) 33-10
11. Hattiesburg (Hattiesburg, MS) 26-11
12. Parkview (Lilburn, GA) 31-6
13. Riverdale Baptist School (Upper Marlboro, MD) 30-1
14. Hamilton (Chandler, AZ) 23-10
15. Providence (Charlotte, NC) 25-7
16. Calvary Christian (Clearwater, FL) 30-0
17. Mater Dei (Santa Ana, CA) 21-12
18. St. John Vianney (St. Louis, MO) 32-7
19. Owasso (Owasso, OK) 31-4
20. El Toro (Lake Forest, CA) 27-7-1
21. Elk Grove (Elk Grove, CA) 23-10
22. Boston College H.S. (Boston, MA) 15-10
23. Southlake Carroll (Southlake, TX) 32-11
24. A.C. Flora (Columbia, SC) 25-7
25. Kokomo (Kokomo, IN) 21-4
26. Hoover (Hoover, AL) 41-11
27. Malvern Prep (Malvern, PA) 25-6
28. Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, CA) 22-5-2
29. Jackson (Massillon, OH) 30-2
30. La Cueva (Albuquerque, NM) 28-1

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Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 HS All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseballs-2018-hs-americans/ Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:04:03 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10364 TUCSON, Ariz. — An all-star lineup of high school players headlines Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 Pre-Season High School All America team. The players on this list represent not only amazing athletic ability and talent in their respective positions, but they also are among the most sought after players by pro scouts and college recruiters. The majority […]

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TUCSON, Ariz. — An all-star lineup of high school players headlines Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 Pre-Season High School All America team.

The players on this list represent not only amazing athletic ability and talent in their respective positions, but they also are among the most sought after players by pro scouts and college recruiters.

The majority of the players have committed to a college and most have received national recognition already. Many were players of the year in their league, region or state and have racked up a number of awards, including national honors. Players are nominated for the honor by their high school coaches.

For statistics and details about each member of the 2018 Collegiate Baseball Pre-Season H.S. All-America team, purchase the Jan. 26, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball newspaper or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

This issue also includes a state-by-state list of the top high school players to watch in the country as well as the top 30 teams in Collegiate Baseball’s National High School Baseball Pre-Season Poll.

FIRST TEAM
Pitchers
Cole Winn, RHP, Orange Lutheran H.S., Orange, CA
Matthew Liberatore, LHP, Mountain Ridge H.S., Glendale, AZ
Jonathan Childress, LHP, Forney H.S., TX
Slade Cecconi, RHP, Trinity Prep, Winter Park, FL
Kumar Rocker, RHP, North Oconee H.S., Bogart, GA
Ethan Hankins, RHP, Forsyth Central H.S., Cumming, GA
Michael Vasil, RHP, Boston College H.S., Boston, MA
Trace Moore, LHP, Nova H.S., Davie, FL
Landon Marceaux, RHP, Destrehan H.S., LA
Luke Bartnicki, LHP, Walton H.S., Marietta, GA
Luke Mann, RHP, St. John Vianney, St. Louis, MO
Gene Hurst, RHP, Oak Mountain H.S., Birmingham, AL
Garrett Schmeltz, LHP, Pleasure Ridge Park H.S., Louisville, KY
Travis Hester, RHP, College Station H.S., TX
Will Morrison, RHP, Cullman H.S. AL
Mason Ronan, LHP, Penn Cambria H.S., Cresson, PA
Carter Raffield, RHP, Bleckley County H.S., Cochran, GA
Lineras Torres, RHP, Beacon H.S., NY
Kyle Perry, LHP, Millard South H.S., Omaha, NE
Brennan Oxford, LHP, Oyster River H.S., Durham, NH
Joseph Brandon, RHP, Loganville H.S., GA
Brandon Neeck, LHP, Horace Greeley H.S., Chappaqua, NY
Timmy Townsend, RHP, Providence H.S., Charlotte, NC
Brandon Dieter, RHP, South Hills H.S., West Covina, CA

Catchers
Will Banfield, Brookwood H.S., Snellville, GA
Austin Wells, Bishop Gorman H.S., Las Vegas, NV
Patrick Winkel, Amity H.S., Woodbridge, CT
Luke Hancock, Houston H.S., MS
Matt McCormick, St. Laurence H.S., Burbank,

Infielders
Brice Turang, SS, Santiago H.S., Corona, CA
Nolan Gorman, 3B, Sandra Day O’Connor H.S., Phoenix, AZ
Triston Casas, 3B/RHP, American Heritage H.S., Plantation, FL
Cory Acton, 2B/3B, American Heritage H.S., Plantation, FL
Alec Sanchez, 2B/SS, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Osiris Johnson, SS, Encinal H.S., Alameda, CA
Branden Comia, SS, Carl Sandburg H.S., Orland Park, IL
Kendall Logan Simmons, SS/3B, Tattnall Square Academy, Macon, GA
Bobby Witt Jr., SS, Colleyville Heritage H.S., Colleyville, TX
Jose Rivera, SS/2B, Riverdale Baptist H.S., Upper Marlboro, MD
Bryce Bush, 3B, DeLaSalle H.S., Warren, MI
Charlie Mack, SS, Williamsville East H.S., Williamsville, NY
Alec Carr, SS/2B, Fort Bend Kempner H.S., Sugar Land, TX
Dax Fellows, SS/2B, Silverado H.S., Las Vegas, NV
J.T. Schwartz, SS, Corona del Mar H.S., Newport Beach, CA
Austin Schultz, SS, Norris H.S., Firth, NE

Outfielders
Alex Thomas, Mt. Carmel H.S., Chicago, IL
Tanner O’Tremba, Cherry Creek H.S., Greenwood Village, CO
Joe Gray Jr., Hattiesburg H.S., MS
Preston Hartsell, Corona del Mar H.S., Newport Beach, CA
Nick Decker, Seneca H.S., Tabernacle, NJ
Kendrick Calilao, The First Academy, Orlando, FL
Eric Kennedy, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Michael Siani, Penn Charter H.S., Philadelphia, PA

Multi-Position Players
Grayson Rodriguez, RHP/SS, Central Heights H.S., Nacogdoches, TX
Ryan Weathers, LHP/1B, Loretto H.S., TN
Simeon Woods-Richardson, RHP/3B/1B, Fort Bend Kempner H.S., Sugar Land, TX
John Thomas Ginn, RHP/SS, Brandon H.S., MS
Brett Brown, SS/P, Godley H.S., TX
Spencer Schwellenbach, SS/RHP, Saginaw Heritage H.S., Saginaw, MI
Anthony Seigler, C/P, Cartersville H.S., GA
Hunter Watson, SS/3B/RHP, Pottsboro H.S., TX
Braxton Ashcraft, RHP/3B, Robinson H.S., TX
Joseph Menefee, LHP/1B/OF, George Ranch H.S., Richmond, TX
Hunter Barco, LHP/1B, The Bolles School, Jacksonville, FL
Mike Doolin, SS/RHP, Andrean H.S., Merrillville, IN
Nick Schnell, CF/RHP, Roncalli H.S., Indianapolis, IN
Cole Wilcox, RHP/1B, Heritage H.S., Ringgold, GA
Connor Scott, CF/LHP, H.B. Plant H.S., Tampa, FL
Jack Perkins, RHP/OF, Kokomo H.S., IN
Mason Denaburg, RHP/C, Merritt Island H.S., FL
Jaden Hill, RHP/3B, Ashdown H.S., AR
J.T. Johnson, 3B/RHP, Greenup County H.S., Greenup, KY

SECOND TEAM
Pitchers
Mason Englert, RHP, Forney H.S., TX
Eric Wallington, LHP, TC Roberson H.S., Asheville, NC
Jack Hinrichsen, RHP, C.K. McClatchy H.S., Sacramento, CA
Yianni Skeriotis, RHP, Jackson H.S., Massillon, OH
Christian MacLeod, LHP, Huntsville H.S., AL
Sandeep Mahl, RHP, Encinal H.S., Alameda, CA
Cutter Sippel, LHP, Southlake Carroll H.S., Southlake, TX
Kyle Lang, RHP, Crystal Lake South H.S., Crystal Lake, IL
Brandon Walker, RHP, North Florida Christian H.S., Tallahassee, FL
Chase Webster, RHP, Mesquite H.S., Gilbert, AZ
Patrick Wicklander, LHP, Valley Christian H.S., San Jose, CA
Justin Jarvis, RHP, Lake Norman H.S., Mooresville, NC
Franco Aleman, RHP, Alonso H.S., Tampa, FL
Rye Gunter, RHP, Coppell H.S., TX
Joshua South, RHP, Cookeville H.S., TN
Cameron Barlow, LHP, Dyer County H.S., Newbern, TN
Kaden Krowka, LHP, Rockwall-Heath H.S., Heath, TX
Matthew Thompson, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Michael Maiolo, RHP, Woodrow Wilson H.S., Beckley, WV

Catchers
Brett Zimmerman, Frankfort H.S., MI
Adrian Del Castillo, Gulliver Prep, Miami, FL
Logan Cerny, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Aaron McKeithan, TC Roberson H.S., Asheville, NC
Kameron Ojeda, St. John Bosco H.S., Bellflower, CA
Cole Stilwell, Rockwall-Heath H.S., Heath, TX

Infielders
Michael Perez, SS, Gahr H.S., Cerritos, CA
Cade Beloso, 1B, John Curtis Christian School, River Ridge, LA
Drake Westcott, 3B, Edwardsville H.S., IL
Jared Poland, SS, Cathedral H.S., Indianapolis, IN
Bobby Goodloe, 2B/SS, Godley H.S., TX
Zach Thomas, SS, Eastern View H.S., Culpeper, VA
Nick Burdette, 1B, Bingham H.S., South Jordan, UT
Grant Lavigne, 1B, Bedford H.S., NH
Emilio Rosas, SS/3B, Mater Dei H.S., Santa Ana, CA
Jay Curtis, 3B, John Curtis Christian School, River Ridge, LA
Anthony Volpe, SS, Delbarton School, Morristown, NJ

Outfielders
Josh Hall, Homewood H.S., AL
Colton Cowser, Cypress Ranch H.S., TX
Christian Franklin, Rockhurst H.S., Kansas City, MO
Brandon Bossiere, Woodcrest Christian H.S., Riverside, CA

Multi-Position Players
Matt Grogan, RHP/OF, St. Michaels H.S., MD
Joe Naranjo, 1B/LHP, Ruben S. Ayala H.S., Chino Hills, CA
Cole Daniels, LHP/1B, Saline H.S., MI
Cade Doughty, SS/RHP/OF, Denham Springs H.S., LA
Jack Filby, SS/C/RHP, C.K. McClatchy H.S., Sacramento, CA
Willie Weiss, SS/RHP, Westview H.S., Portland, OR
Erik Tolman, LHP/DH, El Toro H.S., Lake Forest, CA

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2018 Top New Baseball Products Announced http://baseballnews.com/2018-top-new-baseball-products-announced/ http://baseballnews.com/2018-top-new-baseball-products-announced/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 22:20:11 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10337 INDIANAPOLIS — Eleven innovative products at the recent American Baseball Coaches Association convention trade show in Indianapolis were awarded Best of Show certificates by Collegiate Baseball. There were 68 nominations submitted to Collegiate Baseball for the contest which showcases the top new baseball products of 2017. The 74th ABCA Convention in Indianapolis featured 319 companies […]

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INDIANAPOLIS — Eleven innovative products at the recent American Baseball Coaches Association convention trade show in Indianapolis were awarded Best of Show certificates by Collegiate Baseball.

There were 68 nominations submitted to Collegiate Baseball for the contest which showcases the top new baseball products of 2017.

The 74th ABCA Convention in Indianapolis featured 319 companies that exhibited their products.

Now in its 19th year, the Best of Show awards from Collegiate Baseball encompass a wide variety of concepts and applications that are new to baseball.

Beyond closely examining each nomination that came in, the selection committee spent more than 20 hours evaluating products in the exhibit hall.

A number of superb products just missed being named winners.

Here are the winners, chosen by Collegiate Baseball’s Best of Show selection committee. An in-depth analysis of each winning product is in the Jan. 26, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball as the story explains what makes each one so unique. Purchase this issue by CLICKING HERE.

JUGS BP3 Baseball Pitching Machine

Turf Tank ION GPS Robot

FollowThru Pro Training Bat

VKTRY Performance Insoles

GloveLock

HitTrax (New Platform)

Pitch Analyzer, Hit Analyzer

Zest AutoBat

GripRite HitRite

FlightScope Mevo

Performance Pitch

To read more of this story, which delves into each product and explains what makes each one so special, purchase the Jan. 26, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

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Nate Yeskie Named Pitching Coach Of Year http://baseballnews.com/nate-yeskie-named-pitching-coach-year/ http://baseballnews.com/nate-yeskie-named-pitching-coach-year/#respond Fri, 29 Dec 2017 17:19:09 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10331 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball CORVALLIS, Ore. — Nate Yeskie has been named Collegiate Baseball’s Pitching Coach of The Year for 2017. The Oregon State pitching coach will be the 15th recipient of this award at the American Baseball Coaches Association Convention in Indianapolis this January. He is the first two-time winner of the […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Nate Yeskie has been named Collegiate Baseball’s Pitching Coach of The Year for 2017.

The Oregon State pitching coach will be the 15th recipient of this award at the American Baseball Coaches Association Convention in Indianapolis this January. He is the first two-time winner of the award.

Yeskie completed his ninth season at Oregon State in 2017 and guided the staff to the lowest ERA in the nation at 1.93, nearly one run better than No. 2 Illinois-Chicago’s mark of 2.65.

It was the lowest ERA in school history.

OSU held opponents to two runs or less in 39 of 62 games, and the Beavers produced 23-game winning streaks twice during the 2017 season as OSU was ranked No. 1 for a record 14 consecutive weeks by Collegiate Baseball.

The staff also finished with a national-best 6.27 hits allowed per nine innings, a 0.98 WHIP (walks plus hits per nine innings) and 14 shutouts. OSU had the fewest runs allowed at 141, the fewest earned runs at 121 and the team’s 2.59 walks per nine ranked seventh.

The Beavers also held opponents to a Pac-12 Conference low .196 batting average and set the program’s single-season record with 506 strikeouts while only allowing 162 walks.

Over 62 games, the pitching staff and catchers only allowed 17 stolen bases in 33 attempts.

It marks the second time that Yeskie has been named Pitching Coach of The Year. He was also honored in 2013 by Collegiate Baseball.

Unusual Season
“You set out with ideas at the beginning of the year of how you plan on using pitchers,” said Yeskie.

“Often, that plan doesn’t work out. Somebody will pitch better than anticipated and earns more of a spot in the rotation or bullpen. You get the other side of that as well when somebody doesn’t meet expectations from what he has done the year before. Typically everything is fluid with pitching staffs.

“Last season, we utilized 13 pitchers. Out of the shoot, pitchers did well. The way that games played out, everybody got to get their feet wet, and they did their job.

“As the season unfolded, it was almost like we were replaying those first couple of weeks over and over again. Everybody had a moment.

“Mitchell Verburg didn’t throw a lot of innings (9 2/3 with a 0.93 ERA) but he got a save to clinch the Pac-12 title against Oregon. He also pitched in a huge Sunday game at UCLA where we won the series. Here’s a guy who only pitched a little over nine innings, and he had three important outings.

“Jake Mulholland was a freshman last season and did some great things in save situations. Sam Tweedt was a guy who was in the rotation early in the year and pitched in some big spots out of the bullpen. He won an important game against Vanderbilt in the Super Regionals.

“I have never been involved with a team which had so many pitchers produce like last year’s ball club. When you look at the history of college baseball, it would be difficult to find a staff of 13 pitchers who accomplished what they did.”

Having Your Pitcher’s Back
Starting with the 2011 season, Yeskie utilized a unique plan.

He grew tired of some pitchers never pulling for their teammates while others simply sulked when they didn’t get to pitch. This goes with the territory in competitive sports.

Yeskie’s plan was to have every pitcher and catcher on the staff walk to the bullpen as the starting pitcher warmed up for the game.

When he was done and walked off the bullpen mound toward the dugout, the entire pitching staff and catching corps was waiting for him in a line as each player individually shook his hand or hugged him in a show of solidarity.

Instead of the pitcher being alone with his own thoughts after warming up, he knew every pitcher and catcher on the staff had his back. His mindset switched to not letting his teammates down instead of hoping he had a good performance.

“It was the start of something very valuable in our program, and we have continued it for the past seven years,” said Yeskie.

“It was simply a way of showing your teammate that everyone had your back. I’m here for you. Whatever it takes is whatever it takes today. If you give us four innings, and that’s all you got, I got your back. I will pick you up if I’m the next guy up. If I don’t pitch today, and you go nine or a couple of other guys around me pitch behind you and we win, I still have your back.

“I’m your biggest fan in the dugout, and we’re in this thing together. It is human nature for individuals to think about excelling individually in sports. You want to have a lot of strikeouts or a high batting average. But being that baseball is a team game, we have to count on one another. And we have to support one another when it is going our way and at times when it’s not so we can establish some type of consistency.

“It’s funny how far this has gone. One of our position players, Cadyn Grenier, picked up on it and came out to meet out starting pitcher from the bullpen with a handshake. Then Steven Kwan started doing it. Then it spread like wildfire. When the pitchers were done with the starting pitcher, they turned around and did the same thing with our position guys. That is players doing it on their own which has led the team to being closer.”

Disarming Potential Bomb
Yeskie said he tries to disarm the potential bomb of a pitcher sulking and not actively backing his fellow pitchers in games.

“That’s why I tell each pitcher that he won’t pitch because everybody else stinks. You’re going to pitch because you have performed. I tell pitchers to be up front enough and man enough to understand that you will support that guy no matter what. At the end of the day, he is part of your team, and how he performs, good or bad, really has no bearing on how you should go about your work. The focus needs to be on your work and supporting your teammates.”

Yeskie said this philosophy of pitchers having everyone’s back is not something that is talked about from day one of fall practice.

“We have been doing this since 2011, and all the returning pitchers understand what is expected and relay this to new pitchers. We talk about it usually after we get back from Christmas break to use it as a point of focus to establish what we are doing here.

“There are added things that go into that such as our overall approach. To me, this is the last piece of the puzzle prior to playing games in the spring. It gives kids something to rally around and something good to feel about so they can feel good about being part of this program.

“That’s what I try to remind everyone. When someone chooses to be part of Oregon State, they choose to be part of a program. They didn’t come here just to be a superstar on their own accord. That doesn’t work anywhere to be honest with you. And that is especially true in a team environment.

“When someone is feeling sorry for himself in the dugout or pouting without supporting his teammates, it infects your team instead of affecting them in a positive manner.

“I don’t think it is any coincidence that in 2011 we started to turn a corner with our pitching staffs as far as what I thought we were capable of doing on an annual basis.

“I saw friendships formulating. We have a young man now from Boise, Idaho who lives with a kid from Agoura Hills, Calif. They are the best of friends. Baseball brought them together, and they have established a special bond that will last a lot longer than their baseball careers will.

“Again, when we started this back in 2011, it was an opportunity to shake the starting pitcher’s hand, look him in the eye and tell him you have his back. That’s not just on game day. It is all the time.”

Selfish Element Gone
Yeskie said that the selfish element of players is tossed aside when they become true teammates who care for each other.

“It takes the singular focus away from it. It isn’t about you anymore. It is about your teammates.”

Oregon State’s baseball sports information director Hank Hager has been tracking quality starts by OSU pitchers for years.

He defines a quality start as three earned runs or less in six or more innings pitched in a start.

Since 2011, the numbers have been revealing:

2011: 23 quality starts in 60 games (38.3 percent)
2012: 29 quality starts in 60 games (48.3 percent)
2013: 39 quality starts in 65 games (60 percent)
2014: 41 quality starts in 59 games (69.4 percent)
2015: 36 quality starts in 57 games (63.1 percent)
2016: 24 quality starts in 53 games (45.2 percent)
2017: 39 quality starts in 62 games (62.9 percent)
Total: 231 quality starts in 416 games (55.5 percent)

To read more of this article, purchase the Jan. 5, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball which is the 2018 College Preview edition or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. Yeskie delves into why being brutally honest with pitchers is essential, why constantly educating yourself as a coach is crucial, utilizing video and why this tool can be great or bad for pitchers.

He also explains why getting back to basics is important when everything hits the fan, the importance of catchers, why the game doesn’t change. . .only the variables a bit, how Oregon St. prepares for opponents, the value of utilizing pitchers with many different skill sets, his recruiting philosophy and much more.

Past CB Pitching Coaches of Year

  • 2016: Jason Dietrich, Oregon
  • 2015: Alan Dunn, Louisiana St.
  • 2014: Karl Kuhn, Virginia
  • 2013: Nate Yeskie, Oregon St.
  • 2012: Shaun Cole, Arizona
  • 2011: Phil Cundari, Seton Hall
  • 2010: Mark Calvi, South Carolina
  • 2009: Jerry Weinstein, Colorado Rockies
  • 2008: Scott Forbes, North Carolina
  • 2007: Dan Spencer, Oregon St.
  • 2006: Gordie Alderink, Grand Valley St.
  • 2005: Tom Holliday, Texas
  • 2004: Derek Johnson, Vanderbilt
  • 2003: Mark McQueen, Va. Commonwealth

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National Anthem Is Important To Lee’s Brew http://baseballnews.com/national-anthem-important-lees-mark-brew/ http://baseballnews.com/national-anthem-important-lees-mark-brew/#respond Thu, 28 Dec 2017 18:07:01 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10326 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball CLEVELAND, Tenn. — The next time you watch the National Anthem being played prior to an NFL game with different players choosing to kneel instead of stand at attention, remember Mark Brew. Mark is one of the elite coaches in baseball at Lee University. He directed his first seven […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

CLEVELAND, Tenn. — The next time you watch the National Anthem being played prior to an NFL game with different players choosing to kneel instead of stand at attention, remember Mark Brew.

Mark is one of the elite coaches in baseball at Lee University.

He directed his first seven teams at Lee to the NAIA World Series before leading the transition to NCAA Division II and the Gulf South Conference in 2014.

In 11 years with the Flames, Brew has a 510-168-2 overall record.

What many people don’t realize is that Mark is heavily involved in local veterans’ groups who have served our country with honor and put their lives on the line when necessary to make America safe.

Brew has sponsored Military Appreciation Day each season over the last five years.

Approximately $50,000 has been raised which has helped:

  • A new pavilion be constructed at the Veterans’ Cemetery.
  • A van to transport veterans.
  • Wheelchairs and wheelchair ramps for veterans.

“I didn’t serve in the military, but my father did,” said Brew.

“He passed away in 2010, and part of being executor of his estate, I went through some old archives that he had. I knew he served, but I didn’t know in what capacity. As I researched more about him, I became intrigued.

“It became a personal mission of mine to honor what he had done in the military as we have honored members of the military for the last five years.

“I told my wife one time that if I wasn’t coaching, I probably would be serving in the military. I have always wanted to be a part of a team and something bigger than me. Our Military Appreciate Day was born from that idea.

“We take a day each spring to honor these wonderful people who have served our country. We have two goals in place.

“No. 1, we want to honor and recognize the service men and women in our community. And No. 2, we raise funds. We’ve helped the Disabled American Veterans Association here in town and the Bradley County Funeral Honor Guard, among others.

“We also helped raise money for a big renovation at the local Fort Hill Cemetery which has an beautiful area designated for veteran burials. They needed a nice area to stage events from. We partnered with them and the resources we made from Military Appreciation Day to help them out.

“One of the other projects was a veterans’ park here in town. It is a place of reflection and a place where local veterans can sit down and reflect on their service. That’s under construction by the city. But we were able to make one of the lead check donations as they started the project.”

Brew said there are approximately 7,000 veterans living in the Cleveland, Tenn. area.

“For a smaller community in Bradley County which has about 55,000 residents, it is a big percentage of people. We have a National Guard armory here and the 252nd Military Police Unit stationed in town.

“There is a rich tradition of service here and a natural tie-in. The businesses in town have really gotten on board, and we do T-shirt sales to raise money. The Bank of Cleveland sponsors that project as players help sell the T-shirts.

“Restaurants have donated a percentage of their earnings toward the event.

“The last thing is the event itself. We host the event and have over 1,000 members of the community in attendance at our baseball facility. We raise money through concessions and selling different items. We have vendors set up. Most of them donate the proceeds from what they make back to the event.

“It’s a great community event. It is not just a Lee University or Mark Brew event. It is something our community has embraced which is something we are proud of.”

To read more of this article, purchase the Jan. 5, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. The rest of the story explains how Lee players honor veterans each time the National Anthem is played at games and why they practice doing it correctly. Mark Brew survived a broken home during his youth and talks about the amazing mom he has who made ends meet as a bus driver and worker at a local cafeteria. Plus, he explains how baseball coaches filled the void of his father not being around.

This story is in Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 College Preview Issue. It features a rundown on the top teams and players on all levels of college baseball. It also includes a rundown of the top 92 draft eligible college players in the nation who have a chance of being picked in the first three rounds of next June’s MLB Draft, plus much more. To purchase this issue, CLICK HERE.

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Mike Martin Set To Break All-Time Win Mark http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-set-to-break-all-time-win-mark/ http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-set-to-break-all-time-win-mark/#respond Wed, 27 Dec 2017 16:37:37 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10320 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida St. Head Coach Mike Martin is only 32 wins from becoming the winningest coach in college baseball history. In 38 years as the skipper with the Seminoles, he has put together a 1,944-694-4 record. Only Augie Garrido has more wins as he won 1,975 games […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida St. Head Coach Mike Martin is only 32 wins from becoming the winningest coach in college baseball history.

In 38 years as the skipper with the Seminoles, he has put together a 1,944-694-4 record.

Only Augie Garrido has more wins as he won 1,975 games during a 48-year-career at San Francisco St., Cal Poly, Cal. St. Fullerton, Illinois and Texas.

Martin has coached the Seminoles to 38 consecutive regional appearances and 16 trips to the College World Series as his teams have reached the 40-win mark 38 consecutive seasons under his guidance.

He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2007.

Martin, who is expected to set this historic record some time this season, was contacted by Collegiate Baseball and asked a variety of questions about what he has learned along his coaching journey.

COLLEGIATE BASEBALL: What have you learned during your remarkable 38-year coaching career?

MARTIN: One of the biggest things is the way I treat players. When I first started, it was my way or the highway. After 10 years of being a head coach in the 1990s, I started looking at things a bit differently because I saw that some players reacted differently with criticism.

That doesn’t mean I stopped criticizing players one-on-one. But earlier in my coaching career, I wouldn’t take the time to try and understand what the young man was experiencing in his life whether it might be a girlfriend or parent issue.

Or possibly he was tired from studying the night before. I then tried to be more understanding of the individual. I think that helped me in many regards. I still expect certain things that are team oriented.

But sometimes a young man needs to be coddled, needs support, and as I became a more veteran coach, it was a good approach.

CB: When different players on your team have tested you over the years, from your top athletes to others who don’t see much playing time, how do you handle uncomfortable situations that come up?

MARTIN: I’ve tried to be consistent in the way I have dealt with players. That is very important to the team. I made a vow to myself 39 years ago that I will never use a player to win a game when he has done something that was against team regulations, especially if other players have been punished for the same infraction.

A player will live by that suspension and will not be given any leeway to enable us to have a better chance of winning. I can’t do that.

If I did it for him, what would I do the next time? Many coaches are dealing with marijuana usage by our players.

Heck, it’s legal in several states now. But we have team rules, and we’re going to stay with them.

To read more of this article which delves into many more areas that he has learned in his coaching career, purchase the Jan. 5, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

This story is in Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 College Preview Issue. It features a rundown on the top teams and players on all levels of college baseball. It also includes a rundown of the top 92 draft eligible college players in the nation who have a chance of being picked in the first three rounds of next June’s MLB Draft, plus much more. To purchase this issue, CLICK HERE.

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