Collegiate Baseball Newspaper http://baseballnews.com Sat, 15 Jun 2019 14:48:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 Collegiate Baseball 2019 HS All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseball-2019-hs-all-americans/ Sat, 15 Jun 2019 00:14:56 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13688 TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2019 Collegiate Baseball High School All-American teams, powered by Diamond Sports, are loaded with outstanding talent from across the nation. This year’s crop of high school athletes is impressive and talented on both the first and second teams. Twenty players were selected in the first five rounds and Competitive Balance rounds […]

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TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2019 Collegiate Baseball High School All-American teams, powered by Diamond Sports, are loaded with outstanding talent from across the nation.

This year’s crop of high school athletes is impressive and talented on both the first and second teams.

Twenty players were selected in the first five rounds and Competitive Balance rounds of the 2019 Major League Draft.

Leading the team is our National Player of the Year SS Bobby Witt, Jr. from Colleyville Heritage H.S. (Colleyville, TX). He was the second overall pick in the 2019 Major League Baseball Draft by the Royals.

This season Witt hit .482 with 15 doubles, 9 triples, 15 home runs and 55 RBI. He stole 19 bases.

He played last summer for the 19U Team USA in the Pan American Championships.

Nominations for the All-Americans are submitted by the player’s high school coach and the staff of Collegiate Baseball chooses the honorees.

Not all statistics listed are final for the season. Some teams were still finishing their seasons at the time the All-Americans were selected.

To read stats of every All-American, purchase the June 14, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

First Team
Pitchers

Quinn Priester, RHP, Cary-Grove H.S., Cary, IL
Blake Walston, LHP, New Hanover H.S., Wilmington, NC
Brennan Malone, RHP, IMG Academy, Bradenton, FL
JJ Goss, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Matt Thompson, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Kendall Williams, RHP, IMG Academy, Bradenton, FL
Jack Leiter, RHP, Delbarton H.S., Morristown, NJ
Jacob Meador, RHP, Burleson Centennial H.S., Burleson, TX
Trevor McDonald, RHP, George County H.S., Lucedale, MS
Nick Durgin, RHP, Melbourne Central Catholic H.S., Melbourne, FL
Nick James, LHP, Clarksville H.S., TN
Peyton Wesson, LHP, Fayetteville H.S., Sylacauga, AL
Cooper Benson, LHP, San Luis Obispo H.S., CA
Sam Hliboki, RHP, Harvard-Westlake H.S., Studio City, CA
Geoffrey Gilbert, LHP, Bishop England H.S., Charleston, SC
Nolan Hudi, LHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Chad Ricker, RHP, Argyle H.S., TX
Michael Doolin, RHP, Andrean H.S., Merrillville, IN
Jonathan Guzman, RHP, Orange Lutheran H.S., Orange, CA
Andrew Devine, RHP, Simi Valley H.S., CA
Yianni Skeriotis, RHP, Jackson H.S., Massillon, OH
Ryan Hagenow, RHP, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Tyson Heaton, RHP, Yucaipa H.S., CA
Brandon Walker, RHP, North Florida Christian H.S., Tallahassee, FL
Logan Tanner, RHP, George County H.S., Lucedale, MS
Riley Cornelio, RHP, Pine Creek H.S., Colorado Springs, CO

Catchers

Nathan Hickey, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Ethan Hearn, Mobile Christian H.S., AL
Hayden Dunhurst, Pearl River Central H.S., MS
Nathan LaRue, McGill-Toolen Catholic H.S., Mobile, AL
Mark Black, Serra Catholic H.S., McKeesport, PA
Jonathan French, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Chad Knight, Staples H.S., Westport, CT
Micah Yonamine, Iolani School, Honolulu, HI

Infielders

Bobby Witt Jr., SS, Colleyville Heritage H.S., Colleyville, TX
CJ Abrams, SS/2B, Blessed Trinity H.S., Roswell, GA
Anthony Volpe, SS, Delbarton H.S., Morristown, NJ
Gunnar Henderson, SS, Morgan Academy, Selma, AL
Nasim Nunez, SS Collins Hill H.S., Suwanee, GA
Rece Hinds, SS, IMG Academy, Bradenton, FL
Christian Cairo, SS, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Cade Doughty, SS, Denham Springs H.S., LA
Dylan Ray, 3B, Bob Jones H.S., Madison, AL
Parker Noland, 3B, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Blake Klassen, 1B, JSerra Catholic H.S., San Juan Capistrano, CA
Jose Torres, SS, Calvert Hall College H.S., Baltimore, MD
Brooks Lee, SS/2B, San Luis Obispo H.S., CA
Carter Young, SS, Selah H.S., WA

Outfielders

Riley Greene, Hagerty H.S., Oviedo, FL
Corbin Carroll, Lakeside School, Seattle, WA
Marcus Smith Jr., Pembroke Hill H.S., Kansas City, MO
Chris Newell, Malvern Prep, Malvern, PA
Kendall Pettis, Brother Rice H.S., Chicago, IL
Maurice Hampton Jr., Memphis University School, Memphis, TN
Dylan Crews, Lake Mary H.S., FL
Michael Brueser, Hamilton H.S., Chandler, AZ

Multi-Position Players

Brett Baty, 3B/RHP, Lake Travis H.S., Austin, TX
Jimmy Lewis, RHP/3B, Lake Travis H.S., Austin, TX
Tyler Callihan, RHP/SS/3B/C, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Joe Naranjo, 1B/LHP, Ayala H.S., Chino Hills, CA
Evan Fitterer, RHP/1B, Aliso Niguel H.S., Aliso Viejo, CA
AJ Hacker, RHP/1B, Rowan County Senior H.S., Morehead, KY
Matt McCormick, C/3B/RHP, St. Laurence H.S., Orland Park,
Jared Jones, RHP/3B, La Mirada H.S., CA
Blake Adams, RHP/OF, Har-Ber H.S., Springdale, AR
Jack Washburn, RHP/OF, Webster H.S., WI
Connor Prielipp, LHP/1B, Tomah H.S., WI
Aaron Roberts, RHP/1B/3B, Desert Oasis H.S., Las Vegas, NV
Colin Czajkowski, LHP/OF, Woodhaven H.S., Brownstown, MI
Josh Hahn, LHP/1B/OF, Huntington Beach H.S., CA
Tyler Matyshock, LHP/1B/OF, Sonora H.S., CA

Second Team
Pitchers

Chandler Best, LHP, McGill-Toolen Catholic H.S., Mobile, AL
Max Rajcic, RHP, Orange Lutheran H.S., Orange, CA
Tyler Owens, RHP, Trinity Catholic H.S., Ocala, FL
Trent Harrison, RHP, Pryor H.S., OK
Justin Perreault, RHP, Homewood H.S., Birmingham, AL
Carter Rustad, RHP, Staley H.S., Kansas City, MO
Dallas Glass, RHP, Pleasure Ridge Park H.S., Louisville, KY
Zach Jacobs, RHP, San Dimas H.S., CA
Shane Murphy, LHP, Hamilton H.S., Chandler, AZ
Josh Emerson, RHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Noah Hall, RHP, Providence H.S., Charlotte, NC
Jack Brinley, RHP, Georgetown H.S., TX
Grant Wood, RHP, Georgetown H.S., TX
Kale Davis, RHP, Westmoore H.S., OK
Cameron Repetti, RHP, Cypress H.S., CA
Jack Walker, RHP, Barbe H.S., Lake Charles, LA
JD Callahan, RHP, West Ranch H.S., Stevenson Ranch, CA
Kevin Heinrich, RHP, Stoneman Douglas H.S., Parkland, FL
Jake Garland, RHP, Jupiter H.S., FL

Catchers

Jack Bulger, DeMatha H.S., Hyattsville, MD
Kyle Smith, New Hanover H.S., Wilmington, NC
Parker Landwehr, Calvert Hall College H.S., Baltimore, MD
Michael Carpentier, Yucaipa H.S., CA
Drew Romo, The Woodlands H.S., TX

Infielders

Jeffrey David, 3B, Georgetown H.S., TX
Justin Richards, SS/2B, Sallisaw H.S., OK
Max Anderson, SS/2B, Millard West H.S., Omaha, NE
Jace Jung, SS/2B, MacArthur H.S., San Antonio, TX
Hunter Fitz-Gerald, 3B/1B, Stoneman Douglas H.S., Parkland, FL
Blake Marsh, 1B, Trinity Christian Academy, Addison, TX
Michael Curialle, SS, JSerra Catholic H.S., San Juan Capistrano, CA
Xavier Carter, 1B, Capital Christian H.S., Sacramento, CA
Cooper Beck, 2B/SS, Cullman H.S., AL
Stephen Hrustich, 1B, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Ryan Galanie, 3B/SS, Archbishop Moeller H.S., Cincinnati, OH
Benji Brokemond, SS, Brother Rice H.S., Chicago, IL
Matt Schark, 3B/1B, Francis Howell H.S., St. Charles, MO
Tyler Nelson, SS, Andrean H.S., Merrillville, IN
Grant Magill, Mountain Vista H.S., Highlands Ranch, CO

Outfielders

Tucker Flint, Bishop Hendricken H.S., Warwick, RI
Jared Campbell, Nova H.S., Davie, FL
Makenzie Pate, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Pete Crow-Armstrong, Harvard-Westlake H.S., Studio City, CA
Miller Ladusau, Rockwall-Heath H.S., Heath, TX
Houston King, Cabot H.S., AR

Multi-Position Players

Brooks Gorman, RHP/3B, Tattnall Square Academy, Macon, GA
Brady Davis, LHP/1B/OF, Hamilton H.S., MS.
Nathan Stahl, 3B/RHP, Walsh Jesuit H.S., Cuyahoga Falls, OH
Robert Hassell III, OF/LHP, Independence H.S., Thompson’s Station, TN
Ethan Hoopingerner, RHP/OF, Aliso Niguel H.S., Aliso Viejo, CA
Sam Ireland, RHP/1B, Mountain Vista H.S., Highlands Ranch, CO
Brody Drost, OF/LHP, Barbe H.S., Lake Charles, LA
Dillon Carter, OF/RHP, Argyle H.S., TX
Ben Schoneman, RHP/2B, La Cueva H.S., Albuquerque, NM
Colin Ahearn, LHP/OF, Baylor School, Chattanooga, TN
Drew Gilbert, LHP/OF, Stillwater Area H.S., Stillwater, MN
Cy Nielson, LHP/OF, Spanish Fork H.S., UT
Seth Tomczak, RHP/OF, Argonaut H.S., Jackson, CA
Peyton Lejeune, SS/RHP, Teurlings Catholic H.S., Lafayette, LA
Justin Campbell, RHP/1B, Simi Valley H.S., CA
Colton Keith, RHP/INF, Biloxi H.S., MS

To read stats of every All-American, purchase the June 14, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

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2019 College Baseball Championship Central http://baseballnews.com/2019-college-baseball-championship-central/ Thu, 13 Jun 2019 22:31:52 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13518 Collegiate Baseball is your source for current information on each of college baseball’s major tournaments. Click on any of the links below for information on these championships: NCAA Div. 1 Championship M• College World Series Scores M• Super Regional, Regional Scores M• 8 Super Regional Hosts Named M• 64-Team Bracket M• Top 16 National Seeds […]

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Collegiate Baseball is your source for current information on each of college baseball’s major tournaments. Click on any of the links below for information on these championships:

NCAA Div. 1 Championship
M College World Series Scores
MSuper Regional, Regional Scores
M8 Super Regional Hosts Named

M64-Team Bracket
MTop 16 National Seeds
MOfficial Announcement By NCAA
MAutomatic Qualifiers & At-Large Bids
MNCAA Press Conference Q&A
M16 Regional Sites Announced

NCAA Div. 2 Championship

NCAA Div. 3 Championship

NAIA Championship

NJCAA Div. 1 Championship

NJCAA Div. 2 Championship

NJCAA Div. 3 Championship

California C.C. Championship

Northwest J.C. Championship

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Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseball-freshmen-all-americans/ http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseball-freshmen-all-americans/#respond Wed, 05 Jun 2019 12:00:28 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13638 The 2019 Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-American team, powered by Diamond, features a wealth of baseball talent. The squad is headed by Collegiate Baseball’s National Co-Freshmen Players of The Year OF Ethan Wilson (South Alabama), DH Aaron Sabato (North Carolina) and Freshman Co-Pitchers of the Year Tyler Thornton (St. Mary’s) and JT Ginn (Mississippi St.). Starting […]

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The 2019 Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-American team, powered by Diamond, features a wealth of baseball talent.

The squad is headed by Collegiate Baseball’s National Co-Freshmen Players of The Year OF Ethan Wilson (South Alabama), DH Aaron Sabato (North Carolina) and Freshman Co-Pitchers of the Year Tyler Thornton (St. Mary’s) and JT Ginn (Mississippi St.).

Starting Pitchers

RHP Tyler Thornton, St. Mary’s: Collegiate Baseball’s Co-National Freshman Pitcher of The Year was also the West Coast Conference Freshman of The Year. He posted a 10-2 record, 2.71 ERA and struck out 94 batters with 27 walks over 76 1/3 innings. Two of his best outings this season included 12 strikeouts against California over 7 innings and a dozen strikeouts against Loyola Marymount over 8 frames.

RHP JT Ginn, Mississippi St.: Collegiate Baseball’s Co-National Freshman Pitcher of The Year was also Freshman of The Year in the SEC. Ginn struck out 103 batters with only 18 walks over 80 1/3 innings. He posted an 8-4 record and 3.36 ERA. One of his best outings was against Florida as he struck out 11 Gators over 6 1/3 innings.

LHP Hayes Heinecke, Wofford: A second team pick in the Southern Conference and Freshman of The Year in the league, Heinecke posted a 10-2 record, 2.65 ERA and fanned 84 batters with 15 walks over 88 1/3 innings.

LHP Doug Nikhazy, Mississippi: A member of the All-Freshmen Team in the Southeastern Conference, Nikhazy was 8-3 with a 2.98 ERA and fanned 78 batters with 32 walks over 84 2/3 innings.

RHP Alex Williams, Stanford: Williams had a 7-1 record, 2.48 ERA and struck out 35 batters with 6 walks over 54 1/3 innings.

LHP Rodney Boone, U.C. Santa Barbara: A second team Big West Conference selection and Freshman Pitcher of The Year in the league, Boone was 8-0 with a 2.78 ERA as he struck out 80 batters with 29 walks over 81 innings.

LHP Jeremy Rivera, Alabama St.: Rivera posted a 7-4 record, 2 saves, 4.93 ERA and struck out 60 batters with 24 walks over 65 2/3 innings.

LHP Noah Cameron, Central Arkansas: A second team Southland Conference pick, Cameron was 6-2 over the past season with a 2.95 ERA. He fanned 91 batters with 19 walks over 94 2/3 innings.

LHP Ryan Chasse, Campbell: A first team Big South pick and Freshman of The Year in the league, Chasse was 7-2 with a 2.66 ERA and fanned 57 batters with 27 walks over 74 1/3 innings.

RHP Jesse Bergin, UCLA: Bergin was 5-0 with a 4.09 ERA and struck out 76 batters with 25 walks over 66 innings.

RHP Nic McCay, South Dakota St.: A second team Summit League pick, he was 6-1 with a 4.08 ERA. McCay fanned 83 batters with 30 walks over 79 1/3 innings.

RHP Sam Bachman, Miami (OH): A first team Mid-American Conference pick and Freshman Pitcher of The Year in the league, Bachman was 7-1 with a 3.93 ERA as he struck out 75 batters with 39 walks over 75 2/3 innings.

LHP Jordan Wicks, Kansas St.: A second team Big 12 choice and Freshman of The Year in the league, Wicks was 6-3 with a 3.61 ERA and fanned 86 batters with 26 walks over 84 2/3 innings.

RHP Even Chenier, Virginia Commonwealth: A member of the All-Rookie team in the Atlantic 10, Chenier was 6-0 with a 3.56 ERA and struck out 28 batters with 12 walks over 43 innings.

RHP Pierson Ohl, Grand Canyon: Named Freshman Player of The Year in the Western Athletic Conference, Ohl was 7-5 with a 3.45 ERA, 66 strikeouts and 19 walks over 91 1/3 innings.

RHP Ryan Miller, N.C. Central: Named Rookie of The Year in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, Miller posted a 6-4 record, 3.15 ERA and struck out 73 batters with 13 walks over 71 1/3 innings.

RHP Slade Cecconi, Miami (FL): Cecconi struck out 83 batters with 18 walks over 73 innings and posted a 5-3 record and 4.19 ERA.

LHP Max Loven, North Dakota St.: A first team Summit League pick and Newcomer of The Year in the league, Loven struck out 75 batters with 15 walks over 88 2/3 innings and posted a 4-2 record and 2.74 ERA in 13 appearances.

LHP Daniel Paret, Stetson: A second team Atlantic Sun selection and Freshman of The Year in the league, Paret struck out 102 batters with 47 walks over 94 2/3 innings. He posted a 5-4 record and 3.61 ERA over 19 appearances.

RHP Kumar Rocker, Vanderbilt: A member of the SEC All-Freshmen Team, Rocker had an 8-5 record, 4.14 ERA and struck out 70 batters with 16 walks over 71 2/3 innings.

RHP Ben Abram, Oklahoma: Chosen to the Big-12 All-Freshmen Team, Abram was 6-4 with a 4.24 ERA and struck out 52 batters with 16 walks over 63 2/3 innings in 15 appearances.

Relief Pitchers/Closers

Michael McGreevy, U.C. Santa Barbara: A first team Big West selection, McGreevy was 5-1 with 6 saves and a 2.01 ERA. He fanned 51 batters with 13 walks over 58 1/3 innings in 28 appearances.

Clayton Beeter, Texas Tech.: A second team Big-12 pick and a member of the All-Freshmen team in the league, Beeter posted 8 saves with a 2.79 ERA over 19 appearances and struck out 38 with 18 walks.

Lane Flamm, Xavier: A second team Big East pick, Flamm posted 8 saves with a 2.68 ERA as he struck out 47 batters with 23 walks in 25 appearances.

Brett Kerry, South Carolina: A member of the All-Freshmen team in the SEC, Kerry posted a 4-1 record, 7 saves and 2.62 ERA. He fanned 65 batters with 13 walks over 58 1/3 innings.

Reid McLaughlin, Brigham Young: An All-Freshmen West Coast pick, McLaughlin was 7-1 with 4 saves over 25 appearances as he struck out 46 with 11 walks.

Danny Garcia, Stetson: A member of the Atlantic Sun All-Freshmen squad, he was 5-1 with 2 saves and a 1.22 ERA over 28 appearances. He struck out 32 batters with 18 walks over 59 innings.

Willie Weiss, Michigan: Weiss was a member of the Big Ten All-Freshmen team as he posted 9 saves and a 2.97 ERA over 23 appearances. He struck out 47 batters with 29 walks.

Nathan Price, Air Force: Price was 6-3 with 5 saves and a 2.59 ERA as he struck out 32 batters with 18 walks over 62 2/3 innings.

RJ Petit, Charleston Southern: A first team Big South selection, he was 4-0 with 5 saves and a 2.45 ERA over 20 appearances. He struck out 50 batters with 20 walks.

Catchers

C/1B Austin Wells, Arizona: The Pac-12 Freshman Player of The Year hit .353 with 15 doubles, 7 triples, 5 homers and 60 RBI over 56 games. He also was 6-for-6 in stolen bases.

Taylor Smith, Incarnate Word: A second team Southland Conference pick, Freshman of The Year in the league and also a member of the Southland All-Defensive team, Smith hit .322 with 13 doubles, 16 homers and 57 RBI.

Tatem Levins, La Salle: The Co-Rookie of The Year in the Atlantic-10, Levins hit .321 with 17 doubles, 9 homers and 50 RBI.

First Basemen

Sonny DiChiara, Samford: A first team Southern Conference pick and a member of the All-Freshmen team in the league, DiChiara hit .293 with 21 homers, 7 doubles and 55 RBI.

Maxwell Costes, Maryland: A first team Big Ten selection and Freshman of The Year in the league, Costes hit .266 with 15 homers, 15 doubles and 49 RBI.

Angelo DiSpigna, Mercer: A member of the All-Freshmen Team in the Southern Conference, DiSpigna hit .289 with 13 homers, 11 doubles and 43 RBI.

Salvatore Monticciolo, Fairleigh Dickinson: The reigning Rookoe of The Year in the Northeast Conference, Monticciolo hit .305 with 13 homers, 11 doubles and 46 RBI.

Joseph Carpenter, Delaware: The Rookie of The Year in the Colonial, Carpenter hit .300 with 10 doubles, 4 triples, 5 homers and 37 RBI.

Drew Beazley, South Dakota St.: A second team Summit League pick, Beazley hit .275 with 11 doubles, 4 homers and 21 RBI.

Zach Stevens, Navy: A second team Patriot League selection, Stevens hit .319 with 11 doubles, 3 triples, 5 homers and 28 RBI.

Jaden Fein, San Diego St.: Named Co-Freshman of The Year in the Mountain West, he hit .293 with 11 doubles, 4 homers, 2 triples and 20 RBI over 47 games.

Second Basemen

Cody Morissette, Boston College: A second team Atlantic Coast Conference pick, Morissette hit .320 with 20 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers and 41 RBI. He also was 8-for-11 in stolen bases.

Nic Kent, Virginia: A first team Atlantic Coast Conference selection and a member of the All-Freshmen team in the league, he hit .337 with 9 doubles, 3 triples, 3 homers and 42 RBI. He also swiped 17 of 21 bases.

Edarian Williams, Nevada-Las Vegas: Named Co-Freshman of The Year in the Mountain West, Williams hit .342 with 13 doubles, 1 triple, 1 homer and 36 RBI.

Tyler Black, Wright St.: A first team Horizon League pick and Freshman of The Year in the league, he hit .353 with 11 doubles, 5 triples, 7 homers and 41 RBI. He also was 8-for-11 in stolen bases.

Noah Levin, George Washington: The Co-Rookie of The Year in the Atlantic-10, Levin hit .305 with 11 doubles, 2 triples, 4 homers and 43 RBI.

Nate Brodsky, Fairleigh Dickinson: A first team Northeast Conference selection, he hit .318 with 12 doubles, 2 triples, 6 homers and 29 RBI.

Luke Drumheller, Appalachian St.: Drumheller led the team with a .337 batting average as he hit 15 doubles, 2 homers and 37 RBI.

Third Basemen

Alex Binelas, Louisville: A second team ACC pick and a member of the All-Freshman team in the league, he hit .315 with 13 homers, 12 doubles, 4 triples and 52 RBI.

Antonio Valdez, Incarnate Word: A second team Southland Conference selection, he hit .302 with 14 doubles, 6 triples, 4 homers and 31 RBI. He also was 10-for-11 in stolen bases.

John Dempsey, Wofford: A second team Southern Conference pick and a member of the All-Freshmen team in the league, Dempsey hit .324 with 22 doubles, 2 triples, 7 homers and 41 RBI.

Jack Housinger, Xavier: A second team Big East selection, Housinger hit .275 with 12 doubles and 21 RBI. He also was 5-for-8 in stolen bases.

Mason LaPlante, Yale: A second team Ivy league pick, LaPlante stole 28 of 30 bases and hit 9 doubles with 29 runs scored and 18 RBI.

Shortstops

Justin Johnson, Lafayette: A first team Patriot League pick and Rookie of The Year in the league, Johnson hit .284 with 16 doubles, 2 homers and 18 RBI. He swiped 9 of 12 bases.

Danny Serretti, North Carolina: A member of the All-Freshmen team in the ACC, Serretti hit .297 with 18 doubles, 1 triple, 3 homers and 43 RBI.

Josh Hood, Pennsylvania: A first team Ivy League pick and Rookie of The Year in the league, Hood hit .331 with 13 doubles, 4 triples, 8 homers and 42 RBI.

Zach Dezenzo, Ohio St.: A member of the Big Ten All-Freshmen Team, Dezenzo hit .251 with 9 homers, 9 doubles and 34 RBI.

Outfielders

Ethan Wilson, South Alabama: Collegiate Baseball’s Co-National Freshman Player of The Year, Wilson also was named Player of The Year in the Sun Belt and Freshman of The Year in the league. He hit .345 with 17 homers, 16 doubles and 51 RBI with 59 runs scored.

Andy Garriola, Old Dominion: A first team Conference USA pick and Freshman of The Year in the league, Garriola hit .328 with 19 doubles, 10 homers and 62 RBI.

Colton Cowser, Sam Houston St.: Cowser hit .361 with 17 doubles, 7 triples, 7 homers and 54 RBI. He also was 9-for-9 in stolen bases.

Hunter Goodman, Memphis: A first team American Athletic Conference pick and Newcomer Position Player of The Year in the league, Goodman hit .326 with 16 doubles, 13 homers and 67 RBI. He also swiped 11 of 12 bases.

Hudson Haskin, Tulane: A first team American Athletic Conference selection, Haskin hit .372 with 19 doubles, 10 homers, 4 triples and 52 RBI.

Logan Cerny, Troy: Cerny hit .267 with 12 doubles, 9 homers, 4 triples and 42 RBI. He also swiped 13 of 16 bases.

Garrett Spain, Austin Peay: A second team Ohio Valley Conference pick and Freshman of The Year in the league, Spain hit .333 with 8 doubles, 7 homers, 4 triples and 52 RBI over 56 games.

Sal Frelick, Boston College: A second team ACC choice and a member of the All-Freshmen Team in the league, Frelick hit .367 with 8 doubles, 4 homers and 32 RBI. He also stole 18 of 21 bases over 39 games.

Robby Martin, Florida St.: A member of the All-Freshmen Team in the ACC, Martin hit .342 with 17 doubles, 4 homers and 51 RBI.

Grant Emme, Eastern Illinois: A member of the All-Freshmen Team in the Ohio Valley, he hit .349 with 12 doubles, 4 homers and 30 RBI. He also swiped 14 of 17 bases.

Mitchell Hartigan, Florida Atlantic: A member of the All-Freshmen Team in Conference USA, he hit .326 with 14 doubles, 6 homers and 33 RBI.

Scotty Scott, Hawaii: Named Freshman of The Year in the Big West, Scott hit .291 with 6 doubles, 4 triples, 36 runs scored and 20 RBI. He also swiped 6 of 10 bases

Grant Richardson, Indiana: A member of the All-Freshmen team in the Big Ten, Richardson hit .256 with 9 homers, 8 doubles and 34 RBI.

Justin Kirby, Kent St.: Named Freshman of The Year in the Mid-American Conference, Kirby hit .313 with 14 doubles, 9 homers and 30 RBI. He also swiped 9 of 11 bases.

Dakota Kotowski, Missouri St.: A first team Missouri Valley Conference pick and Freshman of The Year in the league, Kotowski hit .288 with 12 homers, 4 doubles and 29 RBI.

Nick Cimillo, Manhattan: A first team Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference selection and Rookie of The Year in the league, he hit .350 with 12 doubles, 7 homers and 36 RBI.

Tyler McDonough, N.C. State: A second team ACC pick and member of the All-Freshmen Team in the league, McDonough hit .325 with 14 doubles, 5 homers and 47 RBI. He also stole 10 of 12 bases.

Chad Castillo, California Baptist: A Western Athletic Conference second team selection, he hit .335 with 8 doubles, 3 triples, 1 homer, 32 runs and 27 RBI.

Designated Hitters

Aaron Sabato, North Carolina: Collegiate Baseball’s Co-National Freshman Player of The Year was also a first team ACC pick and Freshman of The Year in the league. Sabato hit .338 with 23 doubles, 14 homers and 56 RBI.

Adrian Del Castillo, Miami (FL): A second team ACC selection, Del Castillo hit .329 with 20 doubles, 9 homers and 65 RBI.

John Dyer, Tennessee Tech.: A first team Ohio Valley pick and member of the All-Freshmen Team in the league, Dyer hit .330 with 13 doubles, 11 homers and 54 RBI.

Dayton Dooney, Arizona: Dooney hit .323 with 14 doubles, 10 homers, 53 RBI and scored 43 runs in 161 at-bats for the Wildcats.

Ryan Hampe, Illinois-Chicago: A first team Horizon League selection and member of the All-Freshmen Team, he hit .351 with 14 doubles, 5 homers and 48 RBI.

Noah Ledford, Georgia Southern: Ledford hit .291 with 11 homers, 10 doubles, 29 runs and 44 RBI.

Kevin Graham, Mississippi: Graham hit .255 with 10 homers, 7 doubles and 34 RBI in 141 at-bats.

Multiple Position Athletes

Davis Sharpe, Clemson: A second team ACC pick, Sharpe posted a 7-4 record, 3.20 ERA and struck out 84 batters with 33 walks over 84 1/3 innings. As a batter, he hit .264 with 4 doubles, 3 homers and 18 RBI.

Isaac Coffey, Oral Roberts: A first team Summit League pick, Coffey hit .292 with 11 doubles, 6 homers and 32 RBI. As a pitcher, he was 3-2 with a 3.82 ERA over 14 appearances and struck out 56 batters with 17 walks.

To obtain the June 14, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball which features the 2019 Freshmen All-American team and the regular NCAA Div. I All-American squad, plus all of our college championship coverage and special features, purchase this issue by CLICKING HERE.

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Dads Are Amazing, Powerful Force In Baseball http://baseballnews.com/dads-are-amazing-powerful-force/ http://baseballnews.com/dads-are-amazing-powerful-force/#respond Sun, 02 Jun 2019 22:29:29 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13593 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball WACO, Tex. — Dads are the most precious resource a son can have. This is a special story about a dad who lived his life for his two boys as they ultimately turned into magnificent college baseball coaches and human beings. Mitch Thompson and his brother Nate were reared […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

WACO, Tex. — Dads are the most precious resource a son can have.

This is a special story about a dad who lived his life for his two boys as they ultimately turned into magnificent college baseball coaches and human beings.

Mitch Thompson and his brother Nate were reared in Goodland, Kan. with a population of about 5,000.

The heart and sole of the family was their dad Mac who coached them in baseball throughout their youth and did everything possible to fuel their passion for baseball.

That included making 7-hour trips to different baseball summer camps for Mitch so he could receive great instruction.

Other times, Mac would travel six hours or more so his boys could play on select teams to improve their skills. He even temporarily moved to Denver and Topeka, Kan. for two summers so Nate could play on quality baseball teams.

Mitch, the highly successful head coach at McLennan Community College in Texas for the past seven years, previously coached 22 years at Big 12 and Southeastern Conference schools.

His younger brother Nate is the recruiting coordinator at the University of Arkansas and is one of the rising young stars of coaching who also is an elite hitting instructor.

Everything in their lives was made possible by their dad who passed away from liver cancer a few weeks ago at the age of 81.

Nothing brightened up Mac’s days more than knowing Mitch and Nate were having success in life. He was their biggest fans.

His greatest joy was baseball, and he had legendary status in the community of Goodland, Kan. as he spent many years investing his time and efforts in the youth of this town.

He coached numerous years in the Goodland Little League, K18 and American Legion programs.

In 1980, Mac led the Goodland K18 baseball team to a state championship.

He enjoyed watching and coaching baseball, fishing, hunting and most of all spending time with his family.

“Dad had been fighting liver cancer for about two years,” said Mitch.

“He didn’t want to travel to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston for treatment because he didn’t want to interrupt what I was doing as a head baseball coach. He knew he would need some help getting to the Center.

“However, my dad did receive treatment in Denver which is a little over three hours from Goodland, Kan.

“But MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston is considered the best in the world in dealing with cancer. So we eventually got him in. They felt they could treat the liver cancer he had. They asked him to come back in a month, and they would map it out and get him ready for treatment.

“So we took him back. Unfortunately, his liver was starting to fail.

“He endured two surgeries at MD Anderson. At the end of those surgeries, they felt there was nothing more they could do for him.

“That was on a Thursday. I got him back to Kansas on Sunday. The next Tuesday night, he was transported to Denver on a Flight For Life plane.

“He was having kidney failure, and all the major organs in his body were starting to shut down. So I talked to him two days later on the phone and asked him how he was feeling. He told me he was feeling fine. He just felt a little worn out and tired. But he emphasized that he was OK.

“Then he raised his voice with excitement and said, ‘Two good wins yesterday! Who are you going to pitch Saturday?’ That’s what he wanted to talk about.

“At 2:30 in the afternoon, I was on a conference call with the palliative care team at the hospital.

“They told me that dad’s internal organs were failing. They asked me how I wanted the situation to be handled. I asked the doctors if we were talking about my dad passing in hours, days or weeks? I was told definitely not weeks and probably not hours. But it would probably be the next day or two.

“After the conversation, I called my dad and asked him to please keep fighting because God can still work a miracle here. But if he doesn’t, I want you to run as fast as you can into Jesus’ arms.

“We will take care of mom (Pat), and you don’t have to worry about her. He said, ‘I know, I know.’ Then he raised his voice and said ‘Mitch’ with the tone that those doctors didn’t have a clue, ‘I’m not going anywhere for a while.’

“That night at 9 p.m., he passed. We were thankful that he didn’t have to suffer.”

To read more of this story, purchase the May 17, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. The rest of the story explains the tragic death of Mac Thompson’s two other sons, the amazing story of how Nate was born and how Mitch and Nate are indebted to their dad who did so much for them. He even built a Field of Dreams for Nate when he was a budding young baseball player. As Father’s Day approaches on Sunday, June 16, the full story is one you don’t want to miss.

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Cuevas Explains How To Conquer Wet Fields http://baseballnews.com/cuevas-explains-how-to-conquer-wet-field-problem/ http://baseballnews.com/cuevas-explains-how-to-conquer-wet-field-problem/#respond Sun, 02 Jun 2019 22:20:48 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13605 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball OMAHA, Neb. — One of the most frustrating problems for a baseball coach is rain. Every year, downpours make baseball fields unplayable which cause scheduling problems and a lot of extra work to fix the wet mess. While most schools have a small tarp for the pitcher’s mound and […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

OMAHA, Neb. — One of the most frustrating problems for a baseball coach is rain.

Every year, downpours make baseball fields unplayable which cause scheduling problems and a lot of extra work to fix the wet mess.

While most schools have a small tarp for the pitcher’s mound and home plate areas, many can’t afford a tarp that covers the complete infield.

To compound the problem, many infields are not graded properly so water drains off this portion of the infield.

In an effort to educate many coaches who are forced to be their own groundskeepers, Collegiate Baseball went to one of the best baseball grounds superintendants in the history of baseball, Jesse Cuevas.

This gentleman took care of Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha for 42 years. This was the site of the NCAA Div. I College World Series for 60 years.

Cuevas learned everything about the groundskeeping trade from Frank Mancuso and Hall of Famer George Toma who helped prepare many Super Bowls by the NFL and other big events that required top-notch turf such as the 1984 and 1996 Olympic Games and 1994 World Cup.

For many years Toma was the head groundskeeper with the Kansas City Royals.

“If you have an infield that has been hit by a lot of rain with no protection from a tarp, the first step is getting the water off the infield dirt,” said Cuevas.

“If there is a big puddle, I have used a post hole digger to dig a hole next to the puddle so water will drain into it. I would put a 2-pound coffee can at the bottom of the hole. Water would fill up the hole.

Then you get a hand pump and pump the water from the hole into a bucket and take it off the field.

“The absolute worst thing you can do to the infield dirt is try to broom the water off the field. It moves dirt around and makes the situation worst as a ridge forms near the grass, and then you have a lake.”

Cuevas said that before you can start trying to dry out the dirt, it must be dry enough so you can walk on it without sinking in. When it is at this stage, you initially can use hand rakes with rigid steel tines by multiple players.

“You start by raking the top few inches and keep raking it and turning the soil over and over.

“Once a tractor is able to get on the infield dirt, you can put a nail board on the soil that can be pulled by the tractor, and you will be able to dry the infield dirt out in a reasonable amount of time.

“Over the years, we came up with special use drags. We built a nail drag in front of chain link fencing which was used on wet soil after rains so we could get more air into the soil particles so the wet soil dried quicker.

“We also use this drag to re-distribute soil that might build up in certain areas of the infield.”

To read more of this story, purchase the May 17, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. The rest of the story explains why lighting dirt on fire in the infield is a bad choice and the history of this tactic. Jesse Cuevas also explains how you build a field correctly so heavy rains properly flow off the field and why drainage in any field is absolutely essential so water percolates through the soil quickly, plus more.

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Becoming A World Class Performer Is Complex http://baseballnews.com/becoming-a-world-class-performer-is-complicated/ http://baseballnews.com/becoming-a-world-class-performer-is-complicated/#respond Sun, 02 Jun 2019 21:47:25 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13598 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball (Final Of A 2-Part Series) NEW YORK — What separates world-class performers from everybody else and how are they able to focus at the task at hand when many others can’t? These are questions many have asked for centuries, but not understood until now. Geoff Colvin, senior editor at […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball
(Final Of A 2-Part Series)

NEW YORK — What separates world-class performers from everybody else and how are they able to focus at the task at hand when many others can’t?

These are questions many have asked for centuries, but not understood until now.

Geoff Colvin, senior editor at large of Fortune magazine, spent nearly two years researching this question.

He wrote a remarkable book called Talent Is Overrated.

According to Colvin, the short answer to being a world-class performer is practicing in a precision manner on a regular basis for 10,000 hours. But the subject is obviously much more complex than that.

“What separates world-class performers from everybody else is a deep question,” said Colvin.

“The simple answer is the thousands of hours these people spend with deliberate practice. But the question underneath that is why do they put in those thousands of hours when most people don’t? And why do they push themselves so they reach this level?

“But there is more to it than that. Two different people could put in the same amount of hours, and one person could just go through the motions while the other person could be intensely focused on it at all times. The second person would get much better results.

“So again, why do some people work so hard and with the requisite intensity? That is a much more difficult question. What I have come to believe in many fields, and sports is definitely one of them, is that training starts early in life, and the role of the parent is extremely important.

“At the same time, I have found that every great performer has a moment when motivation becomes internalized. The performer is no longer practicing hard because his parents are making him do it. It becomes his own quest and own pursuit. When that happens, it typically isn’t a goal that is driving him. It is because there is something in the activity itself that he finds rewarding.

“Wherever that comes from is what really separates world-class performers from everybody else. Research has been conducted by a number of people that suggests 10,000 hours of practice done in a precision manner is the magic number. And there is separate research, but related, that shows 10 years is generally necessary. These figures apply pretty well across most disciplines. That is why it is so striking whether you are talking about baseball, playing the cello, the violin or chess, in addition to a number of other disciplines.

“This information suggests that it takes a lot more work than most people realize to be a top performer. They simply aren’t born that way. Consider that 10,000 hours is an enormous amount of time. Twenty hours of deliberate practice a week is a lot by any standard. But you would have to do that for 10 years every week all year long for that amount of time. It’s a huge amount of work.”

To read more of this article, purchase the May 17, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. Geoff Colvin delves into undisciplined practice, why it is important to practice what you don’t do well, why starting young in baseball is crucial, the development between parents and the child, plus much more. We also interview Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi as he explains the psychology of optimal experiences.

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Daytona State Wins 12 Straight GPA Titles http://baseballnews.com/daytona-state-racks-up-12-straight-gpa-titles/ http://baseballnews.com/daytona-state-racks-up-12-straight-gpa-titles/#respond Sun, 12 May 2019 17:03:05 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13469 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — For the past 12 years, Daytona State Junior College’s baseball program has had the highest team grade point average of all NJCAA baseball programs in the nation every single year. The average cumulative GPA during this 12-year span has been 3.65. The highest GPA was […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — For the past 12 years, Daytona State Junior College’s baseball program has had the highest team grade point average of all NJCAA baseball programs in the nation every single year.

The average cumulative GPA during this 12-year span has been 3.65.

The highest GPA was during the 2017-2018 academic year at 3.81. Incredibly, this program has gone 33 consecutive semesters with a 3.0 or higher team GPA.

It is an astounding achievement that has been spearheaded by Head Coach Tim Touma who is in his 18th year at Daytona State.

In most junior colleges, it is a constant chore getting players eligible. A certain percentage of junior college baseball players have a tough time with academics in high school while others have had trouble in 4-year institutions as they matriculate to the JC level.

How in the world has Touma accomplished this Herculean feat?

“I played junior college baseball at Palm Beach Community College years ago, and back then it was all baseball and not much in the way of academics,” said Touma, who later went on to play at the University of Florida where he was an Academic All-SEC performer.

“When I was hired at Daytona State in 2001, it was made clear to me from my athletics’ director and administration that academics had to be emphasized.

“That is the posture even today by our administration. As much as we all want to win baseball games, were are here to help young people with their future.

“The kids we brought in initially didn’t get great grades. We tried to just get young people to understand that having a good education is the most important thing even though baseball is fun and something we all love to do.

“Over the years, we have morphed into this baseball program that has great GPAs. Now it is an expectation to have teams that meet this academic standard every year.”

Touma said his system starts with support within his administration.

“We have a terrific academic advisor by the name of Cindy Iafanti who has been with us the whole time I have been here.  She has helped players with class scheduling so there isn’t any conflict with games during the season and during the fall, as well as practices.

“We try to schedule classes for our players with the best professors we can get. That is important to me.

“We never miss school for baseball. That policy is there all year long. If there is a conflict, you skip the game and the player goes to the lab, class or takes a test.

“Cindy does a great job of scheduling early morning classes to prevent conflicts.

“We have no overnight travel. All of our games are within a couple of hours once we get on a bus for away games. We typically arrive back from road trips at a reasonable time. Then our kids get a good night of sleep and are ready to go the next day.

“If we do have a rainout and games are made up, there have been times when we left kids behind because of class scheduling conflicts. That rarely happens because of good planning and spending years of coaching here.

“Attendance at every class is mandatory unless you are sick. That’s a big key as well.

“I want our players to sit in the first three rows of each class to form a relationship with the professor. We want our guys to be up front paying attention.”

To read more of this article, purchase the May 3, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. Coach Touma explains a special organizational planner that each player must use among other areas that delve into why Daytona State has such incredible grade point averages every year.

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Gillespie Explains How To Handle Discipline http://baseballnews.com/gillespie-explains-how-to-handle-discipline-issues/ http://baseballnews.com/gillespie-explains-how-to-handle-discipline-issues/#respond Sun, 12 May 2019 16:40:21 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13462 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball JOLIET, Ill. — Discipline is a crucial component of a successful baseball team. Without this important element, teams turn into individuals with little direction. Perhaps the greatest college baseball coach in history at motivation was the late Gordie Gillespie who passed away in 2015 at the age of 88. […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

JOLIET, Ill. — Discipline is a crucial component of a successful baseball team.

Without this important element, teams turn into individuals with little direction.

Perhaps the greatest college baseball coach in history at motivation was the late Gordie Gillespie who passed away in 2015 at the age of 88.

He retired following the 2011 college baseball season after 59 years and a college baseball-best 1,893 coaching victories at the time after coaching baseball teams at Lewis, St. Francis and Ripon Colleges. The coaching legend amassed 2,402 victories in four sports. 

Gillespie was inducted into 15 halls of fame and went 55 consecutive years (3,371 contests) without missing a game.

It was undoubtedly the greatest streak in athletics’ history before the flu sidelined him for the first 11 games of the 2008 season.

In 27 years at Joliet Catholic H.S., he led the football team to five state championships.

Coaches today can learn from this master teacher at how discipline can be accomplished the right way with this special question and answer session I had with him years ago.

CB: You are one of the best coaches in the business at motivating players to achieve their potential. One of the forgotten elements in that success is tight discipline but in a caring or loving environment. Can you explain your philosophy on discipline?

GILLESPIE: Everybody today says kids are different. Thank God the kids are different today because they have to be different. Fifty years ago we were doing things a lot differently than we are today. We were just learning to fly airplanes in 1927 or thereabouts. The television world we knew nothing about when I was playing ball is a powerful attractant today. In my day baseball was the only game in town. Well today, baseball is not the only game in town.

There are a lot of games in town. It’s an entirely new world and a new sports scene. I have coached a long time in college baseball and 30 years of high school football. So I do know what the high school kids are like too. The bottom line is that if you treat the kids decently, the kids will respond decently. I don’t think you talk down to the kids. I think you try to speak to the kids as gentlemen, and they will act like gentlemen.

CB: What do you do as a coach when you run into the athlete who challenges you and may attempt to undermine your authority?

GILLESPIE: If you run into a kid like this, a lot of coaches say get rid of the cancer. That’s the easiest way to handle such a situation. Let’s say you come to my program and you don’t act as a gentleman should act. Rather than fire you, I’m going to try to work with you in an attempt to straighten you out by reaching you. I’m going to work with you for a good portion of time until I give up on you. The reason I do this is because I have felt the Lord has placed me in this position as a coach not just to deal with “good kids”. I am going to be dealt a kid who is different.

The different kid is the challenge in coaching. I want to bring him around to the correct way of living. We want to make this kid into some kind of gentleman so he can lead a fruitful life and be a good husband. My role is to work with the cancer. If I can’t cure the cancer, I’ll get rid of the kid ― but only as a last resort. That’s been my way of doing things in my career.

I’ve failed sometimes. But this has happened very few times in my career. I feel if I give up on a kid, this person may be a lost soul.

Others have undoubtedly given up on this kid also. So I take my responsibility to help this individual out very seriously. He may never respond to society. But I will try to straighten him out. I don’t want it to sound corny. But I feel this is what God wants us in the coaching profession to do. Again, the easy way is to cut the boy.

CB: Some players may ask why a coach needs any rules to govern a team. Can you explain?

GILLESPIE: These rules are not only good for baseball. They are good for your body. Your body is your castle. If chewing tobacco will make a hole in your face, we will not chew tobacco. If you chew, you will not be on our ball club. As far as team discipline, whether it be running out a ball or conduct in the dugout, I think you must run a tight ship. The tail will not wag the dog.

That’s the way I coach. I am the boss, and I will run the team in a responsible and fair manner. But it will be my way. I do feel in coaching the more you can trust your kids to handle the game, whether it be catchers calling the game, pitchers thinking, leadership off the field by captains and things like this are important.

The more responsibility we can place on these kids, the more we will have them grow up. We’re running a tight ship, but we also are placing as much responsibility on the kids as we can. That’s another way we make people grow. When they make mistakes, I don’t think you should beat them over the head with the problem. I like to handle the situation by telling the kid maybe we should have done it this way or that way.

I realize players will fall down. But we help them, guide them and pick them up. I try not to stand for a lot of nonsense. I don’t have a lot of problems.

To read more of this article, purchase the May 3, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. Gillespie delves into many different problems coaches face and how he handled them through the years which solved problems.

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Learning Art Of Focus Vital For Ball Players http://baseballnews.com/learning-art-of-focus-vital-for-ball-players/ http://baseballnews.com/learning-art-of-focus-vital-for-ball-players/#respond Sun, 12 May 2019 16:33:08 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13465 By LOU PAVLOVICH Editor/Collegiate Baseball (First Of A 2-Part Series) RIVERSIDE, Calif. — How are elite athletes able to focus with precision time after time as they perform at a consistently high level? It is a question that every baseball coach has tried to answer so their players perform at their peak levels game after […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH
Editor/Collegiate Baseball
(First Of A 2-Part Series)

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — How are elite athletes able to focus with precision time after time as they perform at a consistently high level?

It is a question that every baseball coach has tried to answer so their players perform at their peak levels game after game.

Unfortunately, it is maddeningly elusive.

In this special 2-part series, Collegiate Baseball will answer the question of focus and how it can be achieved.

Years ago, Riverside Community College Hall of Fame Head Coach Dennis Rogers discovered the perfect person to emulate for his baseball players.

That was Alex Honnold, the greatest free solo climber in the world who talked to his team about the mental mine field he endures each time he tries to scale the face of a mountain.

Free solo climbing is without question the most dangerous sport in the world and involves scaling massive rock walls virtually straight up without any ropes or protective gear.

Only a few brave people in the world even attempt it.

The remarkable ascent of a free solo climber involves a person with no fear as he utilizes his shoes, fingertips and tremendous mental focus searching out small cracks to grab along the way.

This extreme form of climbing appears to be a suicide mission in waiting.

The rock walls he scales throughout the world are incredibly intimidating.

With this treacherous type of climbing, one slip, one heavy wind gust, one lapse of concentration, and you are history as you fall thousands of feet to a horrible death.

With free soloing, you have no partner, no safety net…nothing.

At the age of 23, the 5-foot-11 Honnold pulled off an amazing feat by scaling the towering northwest face of Half Dome in September of 2008.

This nearly 2,000-foot granite wall towers above Yosemite National Park. And before Honnold free soloed this wall, nobody had ever contemplated doing it before because of the danger.

To give you a perspective, the height of Half Dome is almost the same as the Empire State Building in New York City at 102 stories.

And Half Dome is such an imposing vertical climb that attempting to reverse his climb downward was out of the question if he got into trouble. There was only one direction he could go…up.

At one stage of the climb, he actually froze because of the difficulty. But after gaining his composure, he focused intently and climbed his way out of trouble and to the top as he made history.

Rogers became obsessed with tracking Honnold down to ask him how he is mentally able to focus with no lapses for long periods of time.

What Rogers found was an engaging personality who mastered climbing in a precision manner.

While baseball players today at a young age don’t practice nearly enough to master skills and instead play game after game on the youth level and on club teams, Honnold trained to climb indoors for about six years before he ever ventured outside to climb on rock walls.

At the age of five, his mother Dierdre Wolownick took him to a climbing gym in Davis, Calif. where he started scaled a wall immediately. At the age of 10, his father Charles Honnold began taking Alex to a climbing gym in Sacramento.

“In talking to Alex, he got mesmerized by learning everything he could about climbing,” said Rogers.

“He wanted to master the inside gym before he ever went outside. Let’s relate this to baseball and how our youth programs work. The way we do things on this level is play game after game without practicing and honing the skills necessary to be better. What Alex did makes perfect sense.

“Let’s teach young kids how to throw, how to field a ball and swing a bat. Let these kids grow and curtail the games until we can master those concepts. That was the big point I took out of Alex Honnold.

“He mastered what his body was supposed to do. This was over the six year period with body growth, hormone changes and other dynamics before he went and played a ‘game’ on the big mountain.

“You could take a thousand things from Alex and how he learned to climb. You can also relate what he does in life. The problem I have with athletes today is that they are pushed too fast at a young age. So many people believe that greatness must come quick because it’s there.

“But 99.9 percent of people don’t have this greatness quality. You have to slow down and do things correctly so there is a mastery of what we are doing.”

To read more of this article, purchase the May 3, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. It delves deeply into the subject of focus in baseball games by players and how it can be achieved.

 

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Gonzales Puts Up Huge Offensive Numbers http://baseballnews.com/gonzales-puts-up-staggering-offensive-numbers/ http://baseballnews.com/gonzales-puts-up-staggering-offensive-numbers/#respond Fri, 26 Apr 2019 16:59:02 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=13375 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball LAS CRUCES, N.M. — New Mexico State’s Nick Gonzales is putting up staggering offensive numbers this season. After 38 games, the Aggie sophomore second baseman led all NCAA Division I hitters in batting average (.451), runs (61) and was second nationally in runs per game (1.61) and on-base percentage […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

LAS CRUCES, N.M. — New Mexico State’s Nick Gonzales is putting up staggering offensive numbers this season.

After 38 games, the Aggie sophomore second baseman led all NCAA Division I hitters in batting average (.451), runs (61) and was second nationally in runs per game (1.61) and on-base percentage (.549).

He has collected 12 homers, 13 doubles and 63 RBI with 31 walks and has a slugging percentage of .797.

Gonzales is a fascinating study of someone who has the passion and will to be a Major League player some day.

He arrived at New Mexico State 5-foot-10 and 160 pounds when he was a freshman.

He transformed his body by adding 30 pounds of muscle. His weight shot up to 190 pounds in a little over a year.

His strength, discipline and work ethic also played big roles in his dramatic improvement from his freshman to sophomore years with the Aggies.

Last season as a freshman, he was the Western Athletic Conference Freshman of The Year.

In 57 games, he led the team with a .347 batting average while compiling 17 doubles, 9 home runs and 36 RBI.

Those are superb numbers for a freshman.

But he wasn’t satisfied as he kept working hard at every aspect of his game.

“My dad always taught me to keep things simple in hitting,” said Gonzales.

“That is what has helped me my entire baseball playing career keeping my hitting mechanics simple.”

At Cienega High School in Tucson, Ariz., he hit .543 his senior season with 9 doubles, 3 triples and 4 home runs.

He finished his four years at Cienega H.S. with a .399 batting average, 120 runs scored, 89 RBI and 45 stolen bases.

“When I got to New Mexico State, Coach Brian Green changed a few mechanical things that allowed me to improve dramatically and get to the next level.

“One of most important changes was getting my back elbow slotted in my side during the swing. It might seem like a small adjustment, but it added significant power.

“Then it was all about putting in the repetitions swing after swing to refine this movement, get stronger and put more muscle on.

“In high school I had pretty good bat speed, but I could never really pull the ball hard with backspin. I would hit balls hard, but it would have side spin or top spin.

“With that small change in my back elbow getting slotted, I could then pull balls with backspin which was a big improvement as I drove balls with backspin to leftfield, centerfield and rightfield.

“I had confidence that I could do well at the NCAA Division I level of college baseball.”

To read more of this article, purchase the April 19, 2019 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. It explains how he put on 30 pounds in a little over a year and how he developed into one of the most talented hitters in the nation

 

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