Collegiate Baseball Newspaper http://baseballnews.com Wed, 20 Jun 2018 13:47:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 Collegiate Baseball’s 2018 H.S. All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/collegiate-baseballs-2018-h-s-all-americans/ Fri, 15 Jun 2018 12:51:26 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12484 TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2018 Collegiate Baseball High School All America teams are loaded with outstanding talent from across the nation. This year’s crop of high school athletes is impressive on both the first and second teams. Twenty-eight players were selected in the first three rounds and Competitive Balance rounds of the 2018 Major League […]

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TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2018 Collegiate Baseball High School All America teams are loaded with outstanding talent from across the nation.

This year’s crop of high school athletes is impressive on both the first and second teams. Twenty-eight players were selected in the first three rounds and Competitive Balance rounds of the 2018 Major League Draft.

Leading the team is Collegiate Baseball’s National Player of the Year in SS/RHP Grayson Rodriguez of Central Heights H.S., Nacogdoches, TX. He had an outstanding year that cumulated into being the 11th pick overall in the Major League Draft by the Orioles.

Rodriguez, who signed with Texas A&M, posted a 12-0 record this season with a 0.19 ERA, 11 complete games, 17 walks, 156 strikeouts in 75 innings. He tossed one no-hitter and 9 shutouts. According to his coach Travis Jackson, he pitched five games in a row without giving up a run.

At the plate, he hit .479 with 10 doubles, 3 triples, 9 home runs and 49 RBI.

Nominations for the All Americans are submitted by the player’s high school coach and the staff of Collegiate Baseball chooses the honorees.

To read the full story with stats of each 2018 Collegiate Baseball newspaper H.S. All-American, purchase the June 15, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball by CLICKING HERE.

First Team
Pitchers

Carter Stewart, RHP, Eau Gallie H.S., Melbourne, FL
Cole Winn, RHP, Orange Lutheran H.S., Orange, CA
Matt Liberatore, LHP, Mountain Ridge H.S., Glendale, AZ
Lenny Torres, RHP, Beacon H.S., NY
Jayson Schroeder, RHP, Juanita H.S., Kirkland, WA
Garrett Wade, LHP, Hartselle H.S., AL
Nolan Hudi, LHP, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL
Sam Hliboki, RHP, Harvard-Westlake H.S., Studio City, CA
Braden Hays, LHP, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Frank Gonzalez, RHP, Flanagan H.S., Pembroke Pines, FL
Joey Magrisi, RHP, Torrey Pines H.S., San Diego, CA
Joseph Brandon, RHP, Loganville H.S., GA
Will Ripoll, RHP, John Curtis Christian School, New Orleans, LA
Geoffrey Gilbert, LHP, Bishop England H.S., Charleston, SC
Garrett Burhenn, RHP, Lawrence North H.S., Indianapolis, IN
Ian Landreneau, RHP, John Curtis Christian School, New Orleans, LA
Franco Aleman, RHP, Alonso H.S., Tampa, FL
Travis Hester, RHP, College Station H.S., TX
Billy Corcoran, RHP, Malvern Prep, Malvern, PA
Trace Moore, LHP, Nova H.S., Davie, FL
Will Morrison, RHP, Cullman H.S., AL
Garrett Parker Schmeltz, LHP, Pleasure Ridge Park H.S., Louisville, KY
Michael Doolin, RHP, Andrean H.S., Merrillville, IN
Willie Weiss, RHP, Westview H.S., OR

Catchers

Anthony Seigler, Cartersville H.S., GA
William Banfield, Brookwood H.S., Snellville, GA
Matt McCormick, St. Laurence H.S., Burbank, IL
Logan Cerny, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Luke Hancock, Houston H.S., MS
Patrick Winkel, Amity H.S., Woodbridge, CT
Brett Zimmerman, Frankfort H.S., MI
Matt Nelson, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL

Infielders

Jordan Groshans, SS, Magnolia H.S., TX
Nolan Gorman, 3B, Sandra Day O’Connor H.S., Phoenix, AZ
Brice Turang, SS, Santiago H.S., Corona, CA
Matt McLain, SS/2B, Beckman H.S., Irvine, CA
Triston Casas, 1B/3B, American Heritage, Plantation, FL
Osiris Johnson, SS, Encinal H.S., Alameda, CA
Grant Lavigne, 1B, Bedford H.S., N.H.
Jeremiah Jackson, SS, St. Luke’s Episcopal School, Mobile, AL
Jonathan Ornelas, SS, Kellis H.S., Glendale, AZ
Cory Acton, 2B/3B, American Heritage, Plantation, FL
Antonio Gauthier, 2B, Barbe H.S., Lake Charles, LA
Brett Baty, 3B, Lake Travis H.S., Austin, TX
Charlie Mack, SS, Williamsville East H.S., Amherst, NY
Nander De Sedas, SS, Montverde Academy, FL
Hunter Watson, SS/3B, Pottsboro H.S., TX
Jose Rivera, 2B, Riverdale Baptist H.S., Upper Marlboro, MD
Jack Pineda, SS, La Cueva H.S., Albuquerque, NM
Jared Poland, SS, Cathedral H.S., Indianapolis, IN.
Grayson Taylor, SS, Cullman H.S., AL
Cade Beloso, 1B, John Curtis Christian School, River Ridge, LA
J.T. Schwartz, SS, Corona del Mar H.S., Newport Beach, CA
Bobby Witt Jr, SS, Colleyville Heritage H.S., TX
Bryce Bush, 3B/1B, De La Salle Collegiate H.S., Warren, MI

Outfielders

Connor Scott, Plant H.S., Tampa, FL
Jordyn Adams, Green Hope H.S., Cary, NC
Nicholas Schnell, Roncalli H.S., Indianapolis, IN
Parker Meadows, Grayson H.S., GA
Joe Gray, Hattiesburg H.S., MS
Alek Thomas, Mount Carmel H.S., Chicago, IL
Nick Decker, Seneca H.S., Tabernacle, NJ
Josh Hall, Homewood H.S., AL
Joey Walls, Rancho H.S., Las Vegas, NV
PJ (Patrick) Hilson, Nettleton HS, Jonesboro, AR
Michael Siani, Penn Charter H.S., Philadelphia, PA
Alec Sanchez, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Tanner O’Tremba, Cherry Creek H.S., Centennial, CO
Eric Kennedy, Calvary Christian H.S., Clearwater, FL

Multi-Position Athletes

Grayson Rodriguez, SS/RHP, Central Heights H.S., Nacogdoches, TX
Ryan Weathers, LHP/1B, Loretto H.S., TN
Mason Denaburg, C/OF/RHP, Merritt Island H.S., FL
John Thomas (JT) Ginn, RHP/SS, Brandon H.S., MS
Timothy Owen White, RHP/SS, Jesse Carson H.S., Mt. Ulla, NC
Jonathan Gates, LHP/1B, Nature Coast Tech, Brooksville, FL
Justin Olson, LHP/1B, Pine Creek H.S., Colorado Springs, CO
Robert Bennett, LHP/1B, Parkview H.S., Lilburn, GA
Jaden Hill, 3B/RHP, Ashdown H.S., AR
Nick Northcut, 3B/RHP, Mason H.S., OH
Kumar Rocker, RHP/1B/DH, North Oconee H.S., Bogart, GA
Spencer Schwellenbach, RHP/SS, Heritage H.S., Saginaw, MI
Cole Wilcox, RHP/1B, Heritage Catoosa H.S., Ringgold, GA
Luke Mann, RHP/3B, St. John Vianney H.S., St. Louis, MO
Erik Tolman, LHP/OF, El Toro H.S., Lake Forest, CA
Austin Pfeifer, RHP/1B/3B, Arbor View H.S., Las Vegas, NV

Second Team
Pitchers

Joshua South, RHP, Cookeville H.S., TN
Luke Laskey, RHP, Tattnall Square Academy, Macon, GA
Patrick Wicklander, LHP, Valley Christian H.S., San Jose, CA
Landon Marceaux, RHP, Destrehan H.S., LA
Isaac Duplechain, RHP, Barbe H.S., Lake Charles, LA
Christian MacLeod, LHP, Huntsville H.S., AL
Bay Witcher, RHP, Loganville H.S., GA
Seth Clark, LHP, Loganville H.S., GA
Ty Madden, RHP, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Mo Schaffer, RHP, Archbishop Moeller, Cincinnati, OH
Yianni Skeriotis, RHP, Jackson H.S., Massillon, OH
John Cashimere, LHP, Coppell H.S., TX
Brandon Walker, RHP, North Florida Christian H.S., Tallahassee, FL
Kyle Perry, LHP, Millard South H.S., Omaha, NE
Chase Luttrell, LHP, El Toro H.S., Lake Forest, CA
Cam Bloodworth, RHP, Walton H.S., Marietta, GA
Stone Parker, RHP, Kailua HS, HI
Gene Hurst, RHP, Oak Mountain H.S., Birmingham, AL

Catchers

Mark Black, Serra Catholic H.S., McKeesport, PA
Jacob Campbell, Janesville Craig H.S., WI
Jay Curtis, John Curtis Christian School, River Ridge, LA
Nick Sizemore, Pryor H.S., OK
Ryan Hampe, Carl Sandburg H.S., Orland Park, IL
Tyler McDonough, Archbishop Moeller, Cincinnati, OH
Will Cain, North Oconee H.S., Bogart, GA

Infielders

Will Chambers, 1B, West Ranch H.S., Stevenson Ranch, CA
Austin Schultz, SS, Norris H.S., Firth, NE
Drew Miller, 2B, Pryor H.S., OK
Parker Noland, 3B, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Jerry Hammons, 2B, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Mante Woods, 3B, Westview H.S., Portland, OR
Joshua Lewis, SS/2B, Roff H.S., OK
Bryant Pietri, 3B, Loganville H.S., GA
CJ Abrams, SS/2B, Blessed Trinity H.S., Roswell,
Jayce Easley, SS, Sandra Day O’Connor H.S., Phoenix, AZ

Outfielders

Chris Newell, Malvern Prep, Malvern, PA
Colton Cowser, Cypress Ranch H.S., Cypress, TX
Will Bethea, A.C. Flora H.S., Columbia, SC
Kendrick Calilao, The First Academy, Orlando, FL
Paul Komistek, Farragut H.S., Knoxville, TN
Bennett Shell, Pace H.S., FL
Dillon Besnier, Tampa Riverview H.S., FL
Christian Franklin, Rockhurst H.S., Kansas City, MO
Corey Rosier, Riverdale Baptist H.S., Upper Marlboro, MD
Lundray (TJ) Reeves, Hueytown H.S., AL

Multi-Position Athletes

Brett Brown, SS/RHP, Godley H.S., TX
Brody Moore, SS/RHP, Oneonta H.S., AL
Jack Perkins, RHP/OF, Kokomo H.S., IN
Branden Comia, SS/P, Carl Sandburg H.S., Orland Park, IL
Tyler Callihan, 3B/RHP, Providence H.S., Jacksonville, FL
Brady Devereux, RHP/OF, Malvern Prep, Malvern, PA
Hayden Juenger, RHP/3B, O’Fallon H.S., IL
Jack Washburn, RHP/OF, Webster H.S., WI
Blake Adams, RHP/OF, Har-Ber H.S., Springdale, AR
Tyler Stuart, RHP/1B, Herscher H.S., IL

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Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-Americans http://baseballnews.com/2018-collegiate-baseball-freshmen-all-americans/ http://baseballnews.com/2018-collegiate-baseball-freshmen-all-americans/#respond Wed, 06 Jun 2018 11:35:04 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12468 TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2018 Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-American team features a wealth of baseball talent. The squad is headed by four exceptional athletes who are Collegiate Baseball’s National Freshmen Players or Pitchers of The Year, including: 1B Spencer Torkelson, Arizona St. CB’s Co-Freshman Player of The Year Torkelson led all NCAA Division I hitters […]

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TUCSON, Ariz. — The 2018 Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-American team features a wealth of baseball talent.

The squad is headed by four exceptional athletes who are Collegiate Baseball’s National Freshmen Players or Pitchers of The Year, including:

1B Spencer Torkelson, Arizona St.
CB’s Co-Freshman Player of The Year
Torkelson led all NCAA Division I hitters with 25 home runs during the regular season – two more than any other player and just one shy of the NCAA freshman record.

Torkelson, Freshman of The Year in the Pac-12 and a first team All-League pick, is just the sixth player to reach 25 home runs since the BBCOR batting technology changes took effect in 2011 and the only freshman in NCAA Division I to reach the milestone in that time.

He obliterated the previous Sun Devil freshman record of 11 home runs set by Barry Bonds in 1983.

Torkelson finished tied with Bob Horner (1978) for second in ASU single-season history, just two shy of Mitch Jones’ school record 27 in 2000.

Torkelson slugged .743 on the season (25 homers, 12 doubles), the third-highest total for any freshman in NCAA Division I in the past two decades and the highest for a freshman in the BBCOR era (since 2011).

Only Rickie Weeks (.849 in 2001) and Jeremy Baltz (.771, 2010) have posted higher freshman slugging percentages in the past 20 years.

OF Ryan Ward, Bryant
CB’s Co-Freshman Player of The Year
Ward put up monster numbers in his redshirt freshman campaign as he was named Player of The Year in the Northeast Conference and was a first team All-League pick and Rookie of The Year.

He not only hit .409 but belted 22 doubles, 5 triples and 8 homers along with 52 RBI in 247 at-bats.

Ward scored 51 runs and collected 101 hits as he only struck out 10 times all season.

RHP Patrick Fredrickson, Minnesota
CB’s Freshman Pitcher of The Year
Fredrickson was the Pitcher of The Year in the Big Ten Conference, Freshman of The Year and was a first team All-League selection.

He posted a perfect 9-0 record, 1.76 ERA and struck out 70 batters with 24 walks over 92 innings.

Closer Max Meyer, Minnesota
CB’s Freshman Relief Pitcher of The Year
Meyer was a first team Big Ten Conference selection and a member of the All-Freshmen team in the league.

He posted 16 saves with a microscopic 1.34 ERA and 2-2 record as he struck out 49 batters with 11 walks over 40 1/3 innings.

To read the entire list of 2018 Collegiate Baseball Freshmen All-Americans, CLICK HERE.

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2018 College Baseball Championship Central http://baseballnews.com/2018-college-baseball-championship-central/ Fri, 25 May 2018 23:37:11 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12360 Collegiate Baseball is your source for current information on each of college baseball’s major tournaments. Click on any of the links below for information on these championships: NCAA Div. 1 Championship M• Regional, Super Regional Scores M• 8 Super Regional Hosts Announced M• 16 Regional Sites Announced M• Top 16 National Seeds M• 64-Team Bracket […]

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Collegiate Baseball is your source for current information on each of college baseball’s major tournaments. Click on any of the links below for information on these championships:

NCAA Div. 1 Championship
MRegional, Super Regional Scores
M8 Super Regional Hosts Announced
M16 Regional Sites Announced
MTop 16 National Seeds
M64-Team Bracket
MOfficial Announcement By NCAA
MAutomatic Qualifiers & At-Large Bids
MNCAA Press Conference Q&A

NCAA Div. 2 Championship

NCAA Div. 3 Championship

NAIA Championship

NJCAA Div. 1 Championship

NJCAA Div. 2 Championship

NJCAA Div. 3 Championship

California C.C. Championship

Northwest J.C. Championship

 

 

 

https://www.ncaa.com/scoreboard/baseball/d1

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Alcohol Abuse Nearly Destroys Matt Deggs http://baseballnews.com/alcohol-nearly-destroys-matt-deggs/ http://baseballnews.com/alcohol-nearly-destroys-matt-deggs/#respond Fri, 25 May 2018 23:35:04 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12375 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball HUNTSVILLE, Tex. — Alcohol abuse nearly destroyed Sam Houston State Head Coach Matt Deggs seven years ago. It had a vice-like grip on him that wouldn’t let go as it caused him to be fired at Texas A&M University as the associate head coach by his best friend Head […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

HUNTSVILLE, Tex. — Alcohol abuse nearly destroyed Sam Houston State Head Coach Matt Deggs seven years ago.

It had a vice-like grip on him that wouldn’t let go as it caused him to be fired at Texas A&M University as the associate head coach by his best friend Head Coach Rob Childress in 2011.

His drinking problem all came to a head on a hunting trip on Jan. 3, 2011 with Childress and his son just outside College Station, Tex.

Deggs brought a backpack full of whiskey and beer along with hunting gear.

Childress and the ranch foreman found Deggs passed out drunk in a deer stand. There were empty beer cans everywhere, a whiskey bottle and a loaded rifle in his lap.

He was driven home by the Texas A&M skipper, and Deggs stumbled onto the driveway which led to an argument with his wife and left his kids crying. Deggs passed out on the couch and woke up early the next morning not knowing where his truck was.

He called Childress and asked if he could pick him up for work since his truck was at the area the hunt took place the previous day.

When Childress arrived, Deggs got in the vehicle.

“Rob looked at me with heartbreak, disappointment and disgust in his eyes,” said Deggs.

“He said two simple words I will never forget: ‘You’re done.’

Deggs was fired from his position at Texas A&M and would go 430 days without a job in baseball.

He went from being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars at Texas A&M to being unemployed.

The addiction of alcohol nearly resulted in a divorce with his wife Kathy and the separation of his remarkable children Kyler, Klaire and Khloe. He was booted out of the house multiple times.

“Seven years ago, I was fired at Texas A&M as the associate head coach,” said Deggs.

“I was broken, and I was drunk, and I wanted to die.

“I was unemployed and couldn’t get a job. I would have done anything to get a job back in baseball.”

Life A Mess
Deggs said his life was a shambles.

“There are two people in the world — people who are humble and those who are about to be,” said Deggs who is a devout Christian now.

“I was arrogant, cocky and conceited, and I was humbled as everything was stripped from me.

“Gather your wife and three kids and inform them daddy is going to rehab. That will humble you.

“As you try to walk out the door, your kids, ages 10, 4 and 2 are grabbing your pant leg begging you not to go as they are crying. That will humble you.

“Spend 430 days away from the only thing you know — baseball — because nobody will hire you because you are unemployable. That will humble you.

“Put a for sale sign in the front yard of your house and then not have the house sell for 17 months, and you have to live in the same city you were fired from. That will humble you.

“Have your children change schools in the middle of the year because daddy can’t afford a private school any more. Your children now won’t be with all their friends because they are forced to change schools because of my actions. That will humble you.

“I want to tell you something that will really knock you to your knees. Sit down with your kids and explain to them that this is how you go through the lunch line now.

“You have to sign your name to a sheet, and they will give you lunch for free. That will humble you because daddy has blown through all of the family’s savings.

“Daddy has a $400,000 house that he can’t pay for any more. Daddy is unemployable because he is a drunk. My kids and wife have lost everything because of me.

“I was living on my very last dime after being the associate head coach at Texas A&M. I was there for six years and was the recruiting coordinator at Arkansas prior to that. Don’t you think there was some pride involved? You darn right.

“I went from that to not having anyone want to employ me. I could not even get a job interview at Texarkana Junior College when their head coaching job opened up. I spent five years there, and probably had the best run anybody has ever had at Texarkana. We went to the JUCO World Series one year and almost made it a second time.

“But they wouldn’t touch me. I interviewed at South Dakota State and wasn’t hired. I interviewed in Nashville at an NAIA school and wasn’t hired.

“I ultimately found work at a feed mill about 20 miles outside of College Station, Tex. loading 18-wheelers full of corn and cattle feed with Guatemalans who didn’t speak English.

“They were great people, and I became really tight with them. That became my life, and that will humble you.”

Deggs then switched jobs and began selling pharmaceuticals.

“I was an absolutely horrible salesmen for pharmaceuticals. I couldn’t wait to get off work and go drink.

“That was my life as I was humbled once again.

“The second thing I learned was that God will not save you until you decide to take action yourself. No change will ever happen without action.

“I was famous for being in the middle of a 12-pack of beer and pray to God that he would take this beer from me as I drank can after can. I was living in darkness. Darkness does not live in the light. By its very definition, it is an absence of light.

“It wasn’t until I stood up and took action that good things started to happen to me. God was there after one step and grabbed me. My life turned around from that point.”

To read more of this story, purchase the May 18, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The rest of the story explains how he was given a second chance in his coaching career by Louisiana-Lafayette Head Coach Tony Robichaux and Deggs’ success led him to the head coaching position at Sam Houston State. It is an amazing story of how he ultimately conquered alcohol and has turned his life around.

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Rice Skipper Wayne Graham Forced Out http://baseballnews.com/rice-skipper-wayne-graham-forced-out/ http://baseballnews.com/rice-skipper-wayne-graham-forced-out/#respond Fri, 25 May 2018 23:22:56 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12380 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball HOUSTON, Tex. — Wayne Graham, one of the greatest coaches in college baseball history, has been forced out at Rice. His contract will not be renewed by Athletics Director Joe Karlgaard after being with the Owls for the past 27 seasons. Rice has won conference regular-season or conference tournament […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

HOUSTON, Tex. — Wayne Graham, one of the greatest coaches in college baseball history, has been forced out at Rice.

His contract will not be renewed by Athletics Director Joe Karlgaard after being with the Owls for the past 27 seasons.

Rice has won conference regular-season or conference tournament titles 21 of the last 22 years.

He has led the Owls to 1,173 wins.

Seven of his teams with the Owls qualified for the College World Series with his 2003 team winning the national title and two ball clubs finishing third.

None of his previous 26 teams at Rice has had a losing season.

Prior to Graham coming to Rice, the baseball program had never won a conference regular-season championship stretching back 78 years to 1914.

Graham has been a college baseball coach for 38 years and won five NJCAA Division I national championships in a 6-year span at San Jacinto College.

Because of this amazing run, he was named Collegiate Baseball’s Junior College Coach of The Century.

He was named the national JC Coach of The Year five times and top Texas JC coach six times.

Graham was inducted into the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003.

There couldn’t be any other possible reason Rice is tossing this remarkable man and coach aside except for one ugly reason — he is 82 years old. 

Collegiate Baseball talked to this legendary coach about how he turned the program at Rice around and kept it at an elite level for so many years. By the way, there was not a hint that his mind was going south. He is as sharp as ever.

“We knew Rice had an academic reputation when we got here 27 years ago,” said Graham.

“Getting a degree from Rice was very desirable. We felt we could recruit but couldn’t go after more than 40 percent of the athletes available. We just couldn’t get them in academically.

“One of the reasons I got the job at Rice at the age of 55 was because I sent 13 players from San Jacinto to Rice over 11 years. I always put academic pressure on my players at San Jac to be solid students.

“I had coached in high school and then in junior college and had a myriad of connections. I felt like I could use that to uncover diamonds in the rough which we did over and over again through the years.

“We parlayed those players into good teams with consistency over the years. I have always been heavy in developing players. I followed the coaching systems of some great coaches over the years such as Cliff Gustafson at Texas and others in the way we had game-like drills.

“What we set out to accomplish at Rice was done. We have had good fortune as well.

“I’m happy to have had the career I did. I feel like I still have a contribution to make to the game because my health is good and mind is clear. That comes from the doctors.

“I don’t know in what capacity that will be after I leave Rice. But I am very interested in the game and love it. We have had a great experience here. I haven’t been treated overall unjustly. I’ve been given enough tools to win.

“This year, it has been very unfortunate because of all the injuries we have had. It’s almost like the good Lord is telling me to leave here because we have had more injuries (9) than I’ve ever seen on any of my teams by far.”

Graham said that at one time as a junior college coach, he wondered if he would ever coach at an NCAA Division I institution.

“When the opportunity came along, I was extremely excited, and our program has prospered for many years.”

Graham said his journey in coaching has been special because he has been able to share it with his beautiful and loving wife Tanya for 35 years.

To read more of this story, purchase the May 18, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE. It delves into how former New York Yankees’ Manager Casey Stengel influenced his coaching, why he believes in letting pitchers and catchers call their own games, and why his offensive approach has always been aggressive, plus more.

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Bold Game Tactics Separate Mike Gillespie http://baseballnews.com/bold-game-tactics-separate-mike-gillespie/ http://baseballnews.com/bold-game-tactics-separate-mike-gillespie/#respond Fri, 11 May 2018 15:27:23 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12305 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball IRVINE, Calif. — U.C. Irvine Head Coach Mike Gillespie, one of the most creative and bold coaches in college baseball history, announced that he will retire at the end of the 2018 season after 47 years as a college head coach. His teams have stolen home at critical stages […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

IRVINE, Calif. — U.C. Irvine Head Coach Mike Gillespie, one of the most creative and bold coaches in college baseball history, announced that he will retire at the end of the 2018 season after 47 years as a college head coach.

His teams have stolen home at critical stages during games on many occasions.

Of the 50 or so times his teams have attempted to steal home, his players were successful every time but twice.

Gillespie’s ball clubs have played 4-man outfields and 5-man infields.

Possibly his most unique use of an extra infielder was when his College of The Canyons ball club was playing Jerry Weinstein’s Sacramento City College ball club years ago.

One of Weinstein’s players had bunted for 30 base hits that season all along the third base line.

So Gillespie did the unthinkable. He pulled an outfielder and placed him 15 feet from home plate near the third base line to take away the bunt from this young man. And the strategy worked.

A special 2-part question and answer session on the creative coaching of Gillespie starts on page 10 of the May 4, 2018 edition.

This remarkable skipper has compiled a 1,145-710-2 record on the NCAA Division I level through 35 games of the 2018 season with stops at the University of Southern California (20 years) and U.C. Irvine (11).

He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2010.

Gillespie is one of only two men to both play for and coach an NCAA-championship baseball team. He was the leftfielder for USC’s 1961 national-championship squad and coached the Trojans to the program’s 12th title in 1998. 

Prior to being the skipper at USC, Gillespie coached at the College of The Canyons where he built the program from scratch.

In 16 seasons, Gillespie compiled a 418-167 record and won 11 Mountain Valley Conference championships, including six consecutive from 1981-86.

He captured three state titles and finished as the California runner-up twice.

His teams finished with 20 or more wins in 13 years of his tenure, posting 30-plus wins six times.

Gillespie’s final squad won 41 games in 1986, the most-ever by a California community college at that time.

He was asked what he has learned during his amazing college head coaching journey which spans over 47 years and 1,549 wins.

“It really has been a great life being a baseball coach,” said Gillespie.

“But I must plead guilty in being a great copycat. I can’t possibly mention every person who touched my life from a coaching standpoint. There have been a number of coaches I have learned from whether it be a coach on the other side of the field, a coach at a clinic or a coaching mentor.

“I would like to single out a few. The first is Wally Kincaid, Hall of Fame coach at Cerritos for many years.”

His teams won six California Community College titles, more than any other coach in California history.

Even more amazing is that his ball clubs produced an incredible 60-game win streak that spanned three seasons — the longest in baseball history.

“Other remarkable people I learned from include Jerry Weinstein (Sacramento City College/Colorado Rockies), Mark Marquess (Stanford), Jerry Kindall (Arizona), John Savage (UCLA). Plus, there are many, many others.”

Magic Of Wally Kincaid
Gillespie said he has acquired a mountain of knowledge through his years in the game.

But the one bit of advice that has stood the test of time was from Cerritos’ Kincaid.

“I watched this man closely through the years and picked up many things. But the one phrase which was so important to me and rang true was ‘Throw strikes, play catch and put the ball in play.’ That is the game stated in simple terms. But it is everything you need to do in a game for success.

“It really does describe the game if it is done right. I don’t know when I first heard him say that. But it has been at least 40 years ago.

“Another thing I picked up from coach Kincaid was that his pitchers were never afraid to throw 3-2 sliders or 3-2 changeups. It was completely foreign to me. While they were doing it, they made our hitters look foolish.

“I thought it would be a great idea to copy, but throwing a slider or changeup in a 3-2 count is extremely difficult for pitchers. If you can do that as a pitcher, it allows more success.

“His teams were so skilled and so disciplined as they played with such confidence. His teams never said anything. For me, he was the first coach to set the standard.”

Gillespie said that one key thing he learned in his career is that every player on the team should be taught as many skills as possible.

“I like home runs and would love it if every one of my players had power. But there comes a time in most games that you have a chance to win where a bunt is appropriate or hit and run is the right move or a stolen base and possibly a squeeze bunt.

“It just makes sense to me that every player’s skills are enhanced by learning all aspects of the game. Then when a situation comes up in a game, every player has a fighting chance to exploit it.”

Gillespie had some of the top closers in college baseball history over the years.

He rolled out Jack Krawczyk at USC in 1998 and Sam Moore at UC Irvine who each had 23 saves to rank tied for second in NCAA Div. I history, plus many more.

Krawczyk Was The Best
“Possibly the most amazing closer we had was Jack Krawczyk. He was a non-scholarship player who recruited us. We lucked into that deal. He didn’t pitch much as a freshman. He was very tall at 6-foot-5, and his best fastball at that time was about 85 mph.

“But he had this Bugs Bunny changeup that few people could hit. And he was absolutely fearless. He was never afraid and had that mentality that dared hitters to try and hit his pitches.

“Most couldn’t as attested to his 23 saves during the 1998 season which still is tied for second in NCAA Division I history. His changeup was probably 75 mph or slightly slower. But you could not detect anything different in his motion from his fastball and changeup. To the batter, they both looked identical.

“There was enough on his fastball that you couldn’t ignore it. When you talk about relievers, he was the best we had.

“There is a mindset that the successful closer possesses that I don’t think you can teach. What is hard to identify are pitchers with this mentality who can thrive in difficult situations late in games. We are talking about the 1-run or 2-run lead or inheriting runners.

“You must have the toughness to deal with situations like this. Some have it and most don’t.

“The other thing is being yourself as a pitcher. If you throw 88 mph, then throw your fastball at that velocity. Don’t try to throw it 94 mph. You see so many pitchers try to muscle up and fail in the process.

“If you have a great changeup, believe in it, dot it where you want it to go and don’t be afraid. It’s easy to say and not so easy to do.

“Wherever I have been, I don’t remember recruiting a pitcher with the idea of using him as our closer. We just sort pitchers out on the staff and see who is capable of doing it.”

To read more of this article, purchase the May 4, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

A special story in this edition explains in detail how he taught runners to steal home which was successful 48 out of 50 times during his 47-year career. It also explains how noted USC Head Coach Rod Dedeaux impacted his life as a player and coach, plus more.

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Mike Martin Breaks All-Time Win Mark http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-breaks-all-time-win-mark/ http://baseballnews.com/mike-martin-breaks-all-time-win-mark/#respond Sun, 06 May 2018 03:00:37 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=10320 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida St. Head Coach Mike Martin is now the winningest coach in college baseball history. The Seminoles beat Clemson, 3-2 in 13 innings for Martin’s 1,976th career win which is one more than Augie Garrido who coached at San Francisco St., Cal Poly, Cal. St. Fullerton, […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida St. Head Coach Mike Martin is now the winningest coach in college baseball history.

The Seminoles beat Clemson, 3-2 in 13 innings for Martin’s 1,976th career win which is one more than Augie Garrido who coached at San Francisco St., Cal Poly, Cal. St. Fullerton, Illinois and Texas over a 48-year-career.

Garrido passed away March 15 at the age of 79 following a stroke.

Martin has coached the Seminoles to 38 consecutive regional appearances and 16 trips to the College World Series as his teams have reached the 40-win mark 38 consecutive seasons under his guidance.

He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2007.

Martin was contacted by Collegiate Baseball and asked a variety of questions about what he has learned along his coaching journey.

COLLEGIATE BASEBALL: What have you learned during your remarkable 39-year coaching career?

MARTIN: One of the biggest things is the way I treat players. When I first started, it was my way or the highway. After 10 years of being a head coach in the 1990s, I started looking at things a bit differently because I saw that some players reacted differently with criticism.

That doesn’t mean I stopped criticizing players one-on-one. But earlier in my coaching career, I wouldn’t take the time to try and understand what the young man was experiencing in his life whether it might be a girlfriend or parent issue.

Or possibly he was tired from studying the night before. I then tried to be more understanding of the individual. I think that helped me in many regards. I still expect certain things that are team oriented.

But sometimes a young man needs to be coddled, needs support, and as I became a more veteran coach, it was a good approach.

CB: When different players on your team have tested you over the years, from your top athletes to others who don’t see much playing time, how do you handle uncomfortable situations that come up?

MARTIN: I’ve tried to be consistent in the way I have dealt with players. That is very important to the team. I made a vow to myself 39 years ago that I will never use a player to win a game when he has done something that was against team regulations, especially if other players have been punished for the same infraction.

A player will live by that suspension and will not be given any leeway to enable us to have a better chance of winning. I can’t do that.

If I did it for him, what would I do the next time? Many coaches are dealing with marijuana usage by our players.

Heck, it’s legal in several states now. But we have team rules, and we’re going to stay with them.

To read more of this article which delves into many more areas that he has learned in his coaching career, purchase the May 18, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

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Southern Nevada’s Remarkable Joey O’Brien http://baseballnews.com/southern-nevadas-remarkable-joey-obrien/ http://baseballnews.com/southern-nevadas-remarkable-joey-obrien/#respond Sun, 06 May 2018 02:58:27 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12311 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball HENDERSON, Nev. — It’s extremely rare to see a college baseball player in the United States who comes from Okinawa, Japan. But that is precisely what the College of Southern Nevada has in Joey O’Brien, a skilled 5-tool player. A graduate of Kitanakagusuku High School in Okinawa, he is […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

HENDERSON, Nev. — It’s extremely rare to see a college baseball player in the United States who comes from Okinawa, Japan.

But that is precisely what the College of Southern Nevada has in Joey O’Brien, a skilled 5-tool player.

A graduate of Kitanakagusuku High School in Okinawa, he is the son of John and Akemi O’Brien. John served in the U.S. military for many years when he was stationed in Okinawa.

What makes the story even more compelling is that Joey is truly a gifted baseball player who can do it all for the Coyotes.

He is not only a talented righthanded pitcher who has touched 94 mph with a 5-pitch mix, but the 6-foot-2, 205-pound sophomore also plays centerfield and leftfield when not pitching and is a polished hitter.

Through 42 games, he is hitting .356 with 8 homers, 8 doubles and 46 RBI. He has a keen eye at the plate as he has walked 29 times and been hit by pitches 9 times with an on-base percentage of .491 and 45 runs scored.

On the mound, he has 38 strikeouts and only 4 walks with a 1.61 ERA for the first 20 innings this season. At one point, he had 29 strikeouts and only 1 walk.

O’Brien, who has signed to play for the University of Hawaii next season, could be a top 10 round pick next June in the Major League Draft.

His training as a Japanese player was very different than what Americans experience. A typical practice in the USA will last two hours or slightly longer.

But in Japan, he would practice five hours a day during school days from 3-8 p.m. and eight hours on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

How in the world does a baseball player from Okinawa, Japan get to Las Vegas which is 6,500 miles from home and a 21 hour series of flights?

“That’s a long story,” said Southern Nevada Head Coach Nick Garritano.

“One of our former baseball players knows Joey’s uncle (Gary Chaney) who lives in Las Vegas,” said Garritano.

“His uncle asked our player a little about the program, and he told him how successful we have been over the years. We were ultimately sent a video of Joey from Okinawa in a workout, and we were very intrigued.

“We got in touch with Joey and asked him if he wanted to come out and see our college and work out for us. He did, and we thought he was a superb player. Joey liked our school and program as well. Before you knew it, we had a player from Okinawa Japan.”

Great Bloodline
O’Brien made the long trip from Okinawa by himself and was picked up at the airport by his uncle who he has lived with during his stay in Las Vegas.

“We will get kids from Hawaii because of a recruiting connection we have with assistant coach Sean Larimer. But this is a first for our program to get someone from Okinawa, Japan.

“It is definitely a long way from home for Joey, but he has done a great job of adapting to the American culture. He is still learning. Joey grew up his entire life in Okinawa and is fluent in Japanese. His father is a retired member of the U.S. Military. That is where he met his wife.

“They have two children. Their son Richie was picked last year in the Japanese baseball draft in the third round. So there is a great baseball bloodline there in the O’Brien family.”

Garritano said another major adjustment Joey had to make was acclimating to the intense heat of Las Vegas when he arrived.

“When our kids show up here in late August, it is typically 112-115 degrees, and it is a dry heat. It just gets you if you have never experienced it. Last August, it was very unusual with 20 percent humidity on some of those really hot days. It was just miserable.

“The kids get after it, and it takes a couple of weeks for them to get used to it. Joey did a great job of adapting to the heat. August and September are two very hot months here. But it cools off nicely in October and is beautiful through the spring season.”

Garritano said O’Brien told him that growing up in Japan, coaches hammered home the point of throwing strikes with his 4-seam fastball.

“In fact, when he got here, our pitching coach began talking to him about throwing a 2-seam fastball and a cut fastball in addition to his 4-seamer. Joey looked at him and said, ‘No, no, no. We don’t do that in Japan. We throw 4-seamers straight.’

“It was explained to Joey that in the USA, we want to get movement with fastballs because it makes hitting pitches much more difficult. He has done a great job of adjusting to this concept.

“He told me that there is much more live game repetitions in a practice setting than back home in Okinawa. That goes for defensive work, pitching and hitting. When he worked on pitching in Okinawa, he focused on the 4-seam fastball hitting spots.

“He told me that we go over a lot more in our shorter practices. But back home, they do the same thing over and over again in lengthy practices to master concepts.

“As far as hitting, it was a lot different as well. As with many Japanese hitters, he has a short swing. When he got here, he told me he wanted to Americanize his swing. We told him it wasn’t necessary because his swing was extremely sound. It wouldn’t be wise to change it. It has worked extremely well for him.”

To read more of this story, purchase the May 4, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

It delves into much more about Joey O’Brien and what amazing skills he brings to the table.

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Cheat Codes For Batter Timing Examined http://baseballnews.com/cheat-codes-for-batter-timing-examined/ http://baseballnews.com/cheat-codes-for-batter-timing-examined/#respond Fri, 27 Apr 2018 17:44:37 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12228 By PERRY HUSBAND Special To Collegiate Baseball PALMDALE, Calif. — The term 100/100 means being 100 percent on time with 100 percent efficient swing mechanics.   In other words, being on time with the hitter’s A swing.  As simple as this sounds, it is one of the most difficult tasks in all of sports.  One […]

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By PERRY HUSBAND
Special To Collegiate Baseball

PALMDALE, Calif. — The term 100/100 means being 100 percent on time with 100 percent efficient swing mechanics.  

In other words, being on time with the hitter’s A swing. 

As simple as this sounds, it is one of the most difficult tasks in all of sports. 

One of the reasons it is so rare is that coaches and hitters are not even trying to make it happen. 

In many cases, the hitting approach relies on athletic ability to adjust to the different pitch speeds.   

Many hitting philosophies are designed around the idea that hitters can hit any pitch speed by just seeing it and hitting it. 

The approach is to look away and adjust in by cheating their mechanics or pulling the hands in toward the body on inside pitches, for example. 

Think of this approach as closer to 85/85 rather than 100/100. 

While there is some truth to the idea that you can make contact with the pitch that way, the mechanical efficiency will not be at 100 percent, and therefore the exit velocity will go down. 

In an earlier study of Joey Votto’s much talked about two strike approach, his exit velocity went down to 70 percent of his max, and he lost 50 percent of his offensive production to save some strikeouts. 

Every alteration or adjustment a hitter makes with their swing will have a cost in efficiency. 

In most adjusted swings, there is a loss in bat speed resulting in a loss of exit velocity which is the number one metric in determining swing efficiency and timing together. 

Hitting the best pitcher’s pitches. This is what the concept of 100/100 is about. 

The being 100/100 is actually very rare. 

Most MLB hitters, in 500-plus at bats, will have it happen only once or twice all season. 

Every other at-bat will result in something less than 100/100. 

The miss hits will feature compromised mechanics, mistimed contact hitting the wrong part of the bat and completely ignoring the Effective Velocity (Ev) illusions of speed.

This point is best illustrated by looking at the MLB leaders in exit velocity in 2017 — Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton. 

I think we can all agree that a player’s maximum exit velocity is the best metric for 100/100 contact, even though the combination of exit velocity and launch angle gives them the most production. 

Exit velocity is the best metric for perfect contact because it only happens when the hitter is producing his most efficient swing…on time. 

Judge’s top ball was a line drive home run. It is very rare that a hitter’s highest exit velocity is a home run.

Aaron Judge
• 1 ball hit at 121.1 mph.

• 13 balls in play at 115 mph or higher (95 percent of max).

• 55 balls in play at 110 mph or higher (91 percent of max).

• 338 balls in play total – averaging 94.9 mph (leading MLB) – (78 percent of max).

Giancarlo Stanton
• 1 ball hit at 122.2 mph.

• 13 balls in play at 115 mph (95 percent of max).

• 88 balls in play at 110 mph (90 percent of max).

• 437 balls in play total – averaging 91.9 mph (75 percent of max).

This is not meant to take away from Stanton’s or Judge’s ability, but rather to point out how incredibly hard it is to be 100/100 against MLB pitching. 

Both Judge and Stanton only managed one ball in play each in 2017 at 100/100. 

Types Of Timing
This term timing is very complex and misunderstood. 

There are a few distinctly different forms of timing involved in hitting a baseball or softball:  

• Body Timing — The synching of the body movements to produce the most efficient swing.

• Pitch Timing — The actual reactionary time of a pitch in multiple locations.

• Effective Velocity Illusions — The effects of spin and movement (or lack of movement) to certain pitches, which add or subtract reactionary time.

If either of these types of timing is off, the exit velocity goes down.

It is interesting to note that 100/100 only happens when all the timings align. 

You will find this hard to believe, but hitters are more often fooled into 100/100 contact than those that happen on purpose. 

This is why off speed pitches are often hit with the highest exit velocities and elevated fastballs on the plus side of the Ev zone are hit about 10 mph less on average than down and away. 

Hitters are fooled into getting extended before impact, becoming more physically efficient by accident. 

The goal of time training is to be 100/100 on purpose through training. 

To read more of this extensive article, purchase the April 20, 2018 edition of Collegiate Baseball or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.  It delves deeply into cheat codes for batter timing and why hitters rarely hit balls at 100 percent.

More On Perry Husband
More information on why hitters miss pitches, effective velocity, deception and how it can be utilized to destroy the timing of hitters can be obtained by going to Perry Husband’s web site at: www.hittingisaguess.com

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Reducing Game Times Is Huge Challenge http://baseballnews.com/reducing-game-times-is-huge-challenge/ http://baseballnews.com/reducing-game-times-is-huge-challenge/#respond Fri, 27 Apr 2018 16:59:30 +0000 http://baseballnews.com/?p=12225 By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR. Editor/Collegiate Baseball NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Don’t tell me that the time of baseball games can’t be shortened. Five years ago, Steve Moyer of the Wall Street Journal wrote a fascinating story about the actual time of action in a Major League game. He discovered that in a typical 3-hour ball game, […]

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By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Don’t tell me that the time of baseball games can’t be shortened.

Five years ago, Steve Moyer of the Wall Street Journal wrote a fascinating story about the actual time of action in a Major League game.

He discovered that in a typical 3-hour ball game, there will be 17 minutes and 58 seconds of actual action.

The other 2 hours and 42 minutes — or 90 percent of the game — is non-action related.

With this being said, why can’t baseball games be shorter in time?

The 2017 College World Series saw an average game time of 3:25 over 16 games, the second highest average in the 71-year history of the event.

Only the 2009 CWS saw a higher game time average of 3:38.

In 13 of the last 14 College World Series, the average game time of all games has been 3:16. The only outlier was 2012 when CWS games averaged 2:54.

Over the last 36 years, there have been no CWS games under two hours. Yet there have been 22 games over four hours.

According to Ben Brownlee, Assistant Director of Championships and Alliances with the NCAA, the NCAA Baseball Rules Committee has never studied the real time of action during play.

“From a playing rules perspective, we have only utilized the duration or length of a game submitted in the stat files to study pace of play,” said Brownlee.

He said that the Baseball Rules Committee approved an experimental rule request from the Big 12 Conference during its September teleconference that allows schools from this league to have a 15-second clock with no runners on base during conference games only this season.

Currently the NCAA rule is that a pitch must be thrown within 20 seconds with no runners on base.

“Violations of the 15-second clock will be the same as the current 20-second clock rule (Appendix F).

“They (Big 12 Conference) will be reporting the length of game difference between conference and non-conference games to the NCAA Baseball Rules Committee to provide additional context for potential rules changes in the future.”

Brownlee added that another time saving study is being done this season involving conference games only in the Southeastern Conference and Atlantic Coast Conference.

Certain teams, but not all, are utilizing experimental wireless communication devices. The catcher wears an ear piece which will link up with a wireless device that the pitching coach can speak into.

The coach will tell the catcher what pitch to throw and what location. The catcher has no way of electronically communicating back to the coach. No data from the Big 12, SEC or ACC is available yet.

Pace Of Play Committee
A 7-member Pace of Play Committee was started in December of 2016 by the American Baseball Coaches Association and is chaired by Tim Corbin of Vanderbilt.

“Pace of play is certainly something that everyone in college baseball is concerned with,” said Corbin.

“We are looking at the components and actions of what transpires in games.

“During our first meeting on Dec. 14, 2016, the first thing we talked about was not changing the strategy of the game or take away the core elements that make our game so good.

“The length of games is certainly a concern especially when you start looking at it from a consumer standpoint whether watching on TV or paying for a ticket to attend.

“We are concerned with the pace of the action in games as well. We would like to remove the dead pockets which stop the flow of the game and manage times more efficiently in games as well.

“The one area we saw that is problematic is defensive timeouts. You will see infielders call time to talk to pitchers or stall so a pitcher has a bit more time to warm up. We discussed ways to reduce time within the game to make games shorter. So we would like to study the number of mound visits on defense and timeouts on defense that take place.

“We also are looking at the transition time when a new pitcher comes into the game as the action is stopped with runners on base as well as the time between pitches and the batter staying in the box.

“We also are looking at possibly limiting the time between pitches in games.

“Also being looked at are the number of mound visits during a game and timeouts in a game a team has.”

 “We won’t make any final decisions until we receive full input from college coaches across the nation. But we are identifying areas where we can reduce the times of games. We want to keep an open mind on all of these areas, but we don’t want to harm the great game we have either.”

To read more of this article, purchase the April 20, 2018 edition or subscribe by CLICKING HERE.

The rest of the article explains other areas that are being studied to speed up games and what the largest area of inaction is during games which will surprise many.

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