Subscribe Today!

Addresses
Advertising
All Americans
Amateur Baseball
Analysis
Awards
Baseball Links
Baseball Camps
Books
Caps
Cards
Chat
Collectibles
Computer
Clinics
Coaching
College
Columnists
Conferences
Cricket
Current Events
Dictionary
Employment
Equipment
Events
Fantasy
Features
Groundskeeping
Hall of Fame
Hats
High School Baseball
History
Hot Dogs
Indices
Instructional
International
Jobs
Links
Link to us
Major League
Medical
Mental
Minor League
New Products
News
Olympic
Organizations
Phone Numbers
Polls
Press Releases
Products
Publication Schedule
Recruiting
Reference
Rules
Schedules
Search
Senior
Showcases
Softball
Software
Sports Cards
Sports Medicine
Standings
Statistics
Subscriptions
Summer
Table of Contents
Teams
Travel
Umpiring
Uniforms
Videos
Vision
World Series
Youth
 

Hitter Strikes Out Only 3 Times In 42 Games
Article printed in May 18 edition of Collegiate Baseball
 
By LOU PAVLOVICH, JR.
Editor/Collegiate Baseball
 
STONY BROOK, N.Y. ó Maxx Tissenbaum of Stony Brook is the toughest batter in America to strike out among NCAA Division I schools.
He has only been fanned three times in 150 at-bats this season over 42 games. And it is no fluke.
 
The hitting philosophy of Stony Brook Head Coach Matt Senk is to stay away from strikeouts at all costs. By utilizing this approach, Stony Brook has consistently been a superb offensive team and ranks fourth in the nation this season with a .327 team batting average.
 
Two other hitters on the team have a minimal amount of strikeouts in Pat Cantwell (5 strikeouts in 142 at bats over 42 games) and Steven Goldstein (7 strikeouts in 103 at-bats over 35 games).
 
"From day one at Stony Brook, it has been drilled into hitters that you must stay away from strikeouts," said Tissenbaum.
 
"And the philosophy here is that you go to a no-stride approach when there are two strikes on you. We have probably gone through 1,000 rounds of practice with the no-stride approach with two strikes. In addition you choke up on the bat with two strikes as well.
 
"It is a team philosophy which allows the offense to do many more goods things than bad. When you strike out, you have made it easy on the defense. But if you put the ball in play, so many good things can happen. You are forcing them to make a play.
 
"Coach Senk isnít asking hitters to protect the plate with two strikes which most likely will result in a weak ground ball. He wants you to hit the ball hard. If it is a great pitch on the outside corner or inside, he has no problem if you hit it foul hard.
 
"With the level of pitchers we go against, this is a great philosophy, and it works extremely well. I see no negatives. You can force opposing pitchers to throw more pitches which gets their pitch counts up. If you force the pitcher to throw more pitches during an at-bat, the percentages are that the pitcher will make a mistake. Even professional pitchers donít hit their spots all the time.
 
"If you see one more pitch and then another, your chances of hitting a hitterís pitch increase. Then you turn two strikes into doubles."
Tissenbaum, who is hitting .367 this season with 11 doubles, 3 homers and 28 RBI, said the team routinely has 2-strike hitting rounds in practice as everyone utilizes the no-stride approach.

READ MORE ABOUT MAXX TISSENBAUM AND STONY BROOK'S APPROACH TO HITTING: This entire article is available.

Call our subscription department at (520) 623-4530 weekdays from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Mountain Time. A copy of this issue is available for $3 while a yearís subscription (14 issues) is $28.

 

Home About CBN   Search CBN Subscribe

 


Copyright © 1998 - 2013 Collegiate Baseball Newspaper Inc. All Rights Reserved. This Document for informational purposes only.
Agreement Disclaimer Privacy Policy